Hal­lo­ran’s re­turn, pos­i­tiv­ity propels ‘Pos­i­tively Memphis’

The Commercial Appeal - - Front Page - John Bei­fuss Memphis Com­mer­cial Ap­peal USA TO­DAY NET­WORK - TEN­NESSEE

More than three years af­ter ex­it­ing Memphis’ his­toric Down­town the­ater, the Or­pheum, Pat Hal­lo­ran is re­turn­ing to a stage of his own mak­ing.

Hal­lo­ran — who led the early 1980s ef­fort to re­store the Or­pheum and then es­sen­tially man­aged the the­ater from 1984 un­til 2015 — has launched an ini­tia­tive called “Pos­i­tively Memphis,” its ti­tle a re­flec­tion of his up­beat at­ti­tude to­ward his adopted home­town.

“I moved here 50 years ago this sum­mer, and I’ve had a great life,” said Hal­lo­ran, 75. “My golf game’s not worth crap and I don’t hunt or fish, so I knew I wanted to do some­thing af­ter I re­tired (from the Or­pheum) that would fo­cus on the pos­i­tive things about Memphis.”

A ‘five-part ef­fort’

Hal­lo­ran de­scribes “Pos­i­tively Memphis” as a “five-part ef­fort” that will pro­mote the city not only to out-of-town­ers but to its own res­i­dents, who, for the most part, have yet to dis­cover such “jew­els” as the Na­tional Or­na­men­tal Metal Mu­seum and the Belz Mu­seum of Asian and Ju­daic Art, to name two at­trac­tions that don’t re­ceive the at­ten­tion of Grace­land or the Memphis Zoo.

The first of the five parts in Hal­lo­ran’s de­sign is the sim­plest: A monthly “Best of Memphis Lun­cheon Series” that will show­case speak­ers in­volved in such bal­ly­hooed Memphis projects as Crosstown Con­course and the planned Union Row de­vel­op­ment.

The series be­gins at noon Wed­nes­day, Feb. 13, at the Cres­cent Club in the Cres­cent Cen­ter, 6075 Po­plar. The speaker will be Dr. Scott Mor­ris, pres­i­dent of Church Health, a non­profit or­ga­ni­za­tion that pro­vides low-cost health care to people with low or ab­sent in­comes. Church Health is also an an­chor ten­ant of Crosstown Con­course. Tick­ets to the lun­cheon are $35 each and are avail­able in ad­vance at

“I moved here 50 years ago this sum­mer, and I’ve had a great life. My golf game’s not worth crap and I don’t hunt or fish, so I knew I wanted to do some­thing af­ter I re­tired (from the Or­pheum) that would fo­cus on the pos­i­tive things about Memphis.”

pos­i­tive­ly­mem­phis.com.

Hal­lo­ran said “Pos­i­tively Memphis” — funded to this point by him­self and his wife, Anne, with as­sis­tance from his son, real es­tate agent Pa­trick Hal­lo­ran — hopes to launch a me­dia aware­ness cam­paign to pro­mote Memphis as “a great place to live.” The other projects in­clude work­ing with non­prof­its to boost their num­bers of vol­un­teers; the mar­ket­ing of Memphis at­trac­tions; and the sale of “Pos­i­tively Memphis” mer­chan­dise, with pro­ceeds to be dis­trib­uted to var­i­ous non­profit or­ga­ni­za­tions.

John Bei­fuss can be reached at john.bei­[email protected]­mer­cialap­peal.com

NATHAN ASHBY

Pat Hal­lo­ran

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