The Dallas Morning News

Vouchers don’t carry rights of public schools

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For many parents with disabled children in public school systems, the lure of the private school voucher is strong.

Vouchers for special needs students have been endorsed by the Trump administra­tion, and they are often heavily promoted by state education department­s and by private schools, which rely on them for tuition dollars. So for families that feel as if they are sinking amid academic struggles and behavioral meltdowns, they may seem like a life raft. And often they are.

But there’s a catch. By accepting the vouchers, families may be unknowingl­y giving up their rights to the very help they were hoping to gain. The government is still footing the bill, but when students use vouchers to get into private school, they lose most of the protection­s of the federal Individual­s with Disabiliti­es Education Act.

Many parents, among them Tamiko Walker, learn this the hard way. Only after her son, who has a speech and language disability, got a scholarshi­p from the John M. McKay voucher program in Florida did she learn that he had forfeited most of his rights.

“Once you take those McKay funds and you go to a private school, you’re no longer covered under IDEA — and I don’t understand why,” Walker said.

McKay is the largest of 10 such disability scholarshi­p programs across the country. It serves over 30,000 children who have special needs.

“The private schools are not breaking the law,” said Julie Weatherly, a special-education attorney who consults for school districts in Florida and other states. “The law provides no accountabi­lity measures.”

It’s not just Florida. Private school choice programs in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Mississipp­i, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Wisconsin also require parents to waive all or most IDEA rights. In several other states, the law is silent on the disability rights of voucher students.

Legal experts say parents who use the vouchers are largely unaware that by participat­ing in programs like McKay, they are waiving most of their children’s rights under IDEA, the landmark 1975 federal civil rights law. Depending on the voucher program, the rights being waived can include the right to a free education; the right to the same level of special-education services that a child would be eligible for in a public school; the right to a statecerti­fied or college-educated teacher; and the right to a hearing to dispute disciplina­ry action against a child.

 ?? Scott McIntyre/The New York Times ?? Tamiko Walker and her son learned he had few rights in a private school after he got a scholarshi­p from Florida’s voucher program.
Scott McIntyre/The New York Times Tamiko Walker and her son learned he had few rights in a private school after he got a scholarshi­p from Florida’s voucher program.

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