The Dallas Morning News

Over the years, liaison took dark turn

Assange, Ecuador grew increasing­ly embittered over foreign affairs, cat’s hygiene

- By GONZALO SOLANO

QUITO, Ecuador — The relationsh­ip between Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and the Ecuadorian­s who granted him asylum had the ups and downs of a telenovela.

Once close allies, the silverhair­ed Australian and leaders of the South American nation grew increasing­ly embittered as feuds emerged over everything from his alleged meddling in the nation’s foreign affairs to the hygiene of his cat.

They finally broke for good on Thursday when President Lenín Moreno allowed British authoritie­s to forcibly remove Assange from Ecuador’s embassy in a tony part of London.

“We’ve ended the asylum of this spoiled brat,” a visibly flustered Moreno said hours later in a fiery speech. “From now on we’ll be more careful in giving asylum to people who are really worth it, and not miserable hackers whose only goal is to destabiliz­e government­s.”

How did their diplomatic liaison take such a dark turn?

Ecuador emerged as a safe haven for Assange in 2012 as his legal options to evade extraditio­n to Sweden over sex crime accusation­s dried up in the United Kingdom. On a June day, he moved into the country’s embassy near the upscale Harrods department store for what most thought would be a short stay.

Instead, the cramped quarters, where a small office was converted into a bedroom, became a longtime address that some likened to a de facto jail.

At the time, Ecuador was governed by Rafael Correa, a leftist with an antiUnited States bent who championed the cause of Assange, who had infuriated Washington by publishing a vast trove of confidenti­al U.S. government documents on his Wikileaks site.

For Correa, granting Assange asylum allowed him to stake a moral high ground, associatin­g himself with a man whose followers see him as a digitalage Robin Hood crusading against big government­s and corporatio­ns.

The embassy has just a few rooms, and Assange’s new home was far from luxurious. Stuck inside, he used a treadmill to stay in shape, sat beneath a sun lamp to compensate for the lack of natural light, and received both visitors and pizza deliveries.

The roster of guests at No. 3 Hans Crescent included stars Lady Gaga and Pamela Anderson.

The first major public squabble with Ecuadorian officials came four years later, in 2016, when Ecuador’s government cut off Assange’s internet access after Wikileaks published a trove of damaging emails from Hillary Clinton’s presidenti­al campaign.

In targeting Clinton, Assange may have run up against Correa’s own preference for the Democratic candidate and his effort to repair testy relations with Washington. Wikileaks accused Ecuador of bowing to pressure from U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, a charge Ecuador denied.

A year later, Assange emerged as a thorn in Ecuador’s side again.

During the country’s 2017 presidenti­al election, the activist’s protracted embassy stay became a campaign issue. Conservati­ve banker Guillérmo Lasso said he would evict Assange within 30 days if elected. Moreno, Correa’s handpicked successor, said he would let him stay — and narrowly won.

Following the vote, Assange took to Twitter to take a jab at Lasso.

“I cordially invite Lasso to leave Ecuador within 30 days (with or without his tax haven millions),” he wrote, alluding to allegation­s the banker had money abroad.

The remarks rattled Moreno, who warned Assange to stay out of the country’s politics.

Within months of taking office, Moreno’s government scolded Assange again for meddling in internatio­nal affairs by voicing from the Ecuadorian Embassy his support for Catalan secessioni­sts in Spain. Relations grew so prickly that a year later, Ecuador imposed a stricter set of rules outlining what he could and couldn’t do inside the embassy.

Under the new protocol, Assange would have to pay for his internet and clean up after his cat, an evident source of tension between both sides. The rules said that if the feline wasn’t properly fed and cleaned up after, it would be sent to the pound.

Correa said Thursday he thinks the final straw for Moreno was Wikileaks’ decision to spread informatio­n about a purported offshore account controlled by the president’s brother. Personal photograph­s of Moreno lying in bed, as well as images of close family members dancing, were also leaked, incensing him.

Interior Minister María Paula Romo said Assange’s behavior had become intolerabl­e, and accused him even of spreading fecal matter on embassy walls. Speaking Thursday at an event outside Quito, Moreno said Assange’s egregious behavior signified that the computer expert viewed Ecuador as an insignific­ant, thirdrate country.

“When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food, you don’t denounce the owner of the house,” he said to applause.

 ?? Dolores Ochoa/the Associated Press ?? Ecuador President Lenín Moreno said Thursday that Julian Assange’s behavior signified he viewed Ecuador as an insignific­ant, thirdrate country. “When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food, you don’t denounce the owner of the house.”
Dolores Ochoa/the Associated Press Ecuador President Lenín Moreno said Thursday that Julian Assange’s behavior signified he viewed Ecuador as an insignific­ant, thirdrate country. “When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food, you don’t denounce the owner of the house.”

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