Long­time teacher Wood cel­e­brated by fam­ily, friends

The Enquire-Gazette - - Front Page - Mary McHale 301-735-3451

Deb­o­rah Wood, 65, a teacher in the Prince Ge­orge’s County Schools for 42 years, died May 26 at her home in Camp Springs.

Debby was born in Lawrence, Mass., the daugh­ter of Floyd and Mar­ian Trayn­ham. She grad­u­ated from Oak­ton High School, in Vi­enna, Va., and the Univer­sity of Ge­or­gia and be­gan her long, ded­i­cated teach­ing ca­reer in Prince Ge­orge’s County.

About 150 teach­ers turned out for Debby’s me­mo­rial ser­vice at St. Philip’s Church on June 23. In her eu­logy, Mary Hend­ley re­counted how she and Debby started their ca­reers at North Forestville Ele­men­tary. Debby taught sixth grade, but the next year, to her de­light, she moved to the sec­ond grade.

Her great­est in­ter­est was teach­ing chil­dren to read. In 2002 she be­gan to work with Read­ing Re­cov­ery, a highly ef­fec­tive short-term in­ter­ven­tion of one-to-one tu­tor­ing for low-achiev­ing first graders. In re­cent years she be­came a Teacher Leader, help­ing teach­ers to use Read­ing Re­cov­ery. Over her 42 years with Prince Ge­orge’s Schools, she taught at sev­eral schools, in­clud­ing Tayac and Pointer Ridge. Her last school was Doswell E. Brooks in Capi­tol Heights. At the same time, she worked with the In­struc­tional Sup­port Ser­vices Cen­ter, also in Capi­tol Heights.

The gov­er­nor named her a “Beloved Mary­lan­der” and one year she was named Teacher of the Year. A schol­ar­ship fund has been es­tab­lished in Debby’s name at the Read­ing Re­cov­ery Coun­cil of North Amer­ica (R.R.C.N.A.).

She was a mem­ber of the Daugh­ters of the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion.

Tif­fany Garner and Kathryn Hard­man also paid beau­ti­ful trib­ute to Debby at the me­mo­rial Mass con­cel­e­brated by the Revs. Ed­ward Heg­nauer and Bernard Ihrie. The Rev. Michael Quill, who mar­ried Debby and Terry some years ago on New Year’s Eve, gave a beau­ti­ful homily.

Sur­vivors in­clude her hus­band Ter­rence, sis­ters, Vicci Wil­liams (Larry) and Lee Shat­tuck (John), and the teach­ers and first graders of Prince Ge­orge’s County Schools.

Peo­ple

Mocile Trot­ter, pres­i­dent of the Crowne Mead­ows Home­own­ers As­so­ci­a­tion, phoned to fill me in on a new mo­tel that has been OKed, “with restric­tions,” on Suit­land Road at Re­gency Park­way, near Crowne Mead­ows. There was a meet­ing of con­cerned res­i­dents at a nearby church on June 30. More about this in a fu­ture col­umn.

Va­lerie McDon­ald of Sky­line has just grad­u­ated from Amer­i­can Univer­sity with a masters de­gree in arts man­age­ment. Her un­der­grad­u­ate de­gree was from North Carolina State.

Harry Flem­ing, a long­time Sky­line Drive res­i­dent, cel­e­brated his 97th birthday on May 13 at an as­sisted-liv­ing home. Harry, who lived across the street from me, had been a cab driver in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. for many years. As he told me, he knew ev­ery inch of the city.

The an­nual Morn­ing­side Re­union at Dou­glas Pat­ter­son Park on May 14 drew the usual crowd of nos­tal­gic Morn­ingsiders. Among them, Jean Ni­chols and lots of the Ni­chols fam­ily who had a great time. I told her to let me know ear­lier next year. I might wan­der up there and see if I know any­one.

Com­ing up

The Na­tional Mu­seum of African Amer­i­can History and Cul­ture is for­mally open­ing on Sept. 24 when Pres­i­dent Obama will cut the rib­bon.

MGM Re­sorts In­ter­na­tional is due to open Dec. 8. In the mean­time, MGM will be hiring em­ploy­ees for more than 100 job clas­si­fi­ca­tions be­gin­ning this month. The Employment Cen­ter is housed in the for­mer Thomas Ad­di­son Ele­men­tary at 7100 Oxon Hill Road. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon­day through Fri­day.

‘If you visit Camp Springs Field...’

Wear your walk­ing shoes, as Jo Bernard McDon­nell ad­vised in the May 31, 1943, Wash­ing­ton Daily News. He re­ported that shov­els and scoops and bull­doz­ers are tear­ing down hills and fill­ing in hol­lows.

The 131-foot con­trol tower is made en­tirely of wood, bolted to­gether. There is a moder­ate-sized han­gar and a cou­ple of small build­ings scat­tered about. “Some dirt roads ap­par­ently me­an­der thru the woods and here and there you can pick out an old farm house.” The field cov­ers nearly 7 and a half square miles, off Marl­boro Road and takes its name from the town of Camp Springs.

“Forces and fa­cil­i­ties gen­er­ally are so scat­tered,” McDon­nell wrote, “that an en­emy prob­a­bly couldn’t put the field en­tirely out of com­mis­sion. The plan was born of bit­ter ex­pe­ri­ence — Pearl Har­bor.”

To be con­tin­ued.

May they rest in peace

Ed­win Gwynn “Doc” Mudd, a man­ager for Huntt Fu­neral Home in Wal­dorf for 47 years, died June 23, two days af­ter he turned 91. He was born and grew up in Wal­dorf, son of Ray­mond and Eu­ge­nia (Brent) Mudd. He had a twin, the late Brent Mudd, and four other sib­lings: Ray­mond, Regi­nald, Paul and Amelia. He served in the Army in the 1950s, was a char­ter mem­ber of the Wal­dorf Fire De­part­ment and a life­time mem­ber of the Knights of Colum­bus. Sur­vivors in­clude his wife Theresa; daugh­ters Bev­er­ley Ware­ham and Robin Mag­nelli, five grand­chil­dren, 13 great-grand­chil­dren and one great-great-grand­child. Doc is my sec­ond cousin, once re­moved, and the un­cle of my son-in-law John Mudd.

David H. Hur­ley, 72, a 1962 grad­u­ate of Oxon Hill High School, died June 9 in Leonard­town. He was re­tired from the Na­tional Science Foun­da­tion. Sur­vivors in­clude his wife of 48 years, Phyl­lis, two chil­dren, two grand­chil­dren and two brothers, Pa­trick and James Hur­ley.

Mile­stones

Happy birthday to Jimmy Gromen and An­thony Cur­cio-Bob­bitt, July 8; Kar­lyn Davis, John An­thony III and my grand­son Zachary Sei­d­man, July 9; my daugh­ter Elaine Sei­d­man, July 10; Kevin Kline, Ni­cole Wade, Dee (Cur­cio) Brown and Dave Wil­liams Jr., July 11; Ke­nard Simms, July 13; Lav­erne Peggy Simms, Krista Lane­hart and Laura (Thomp­son) Hoff­mann, July 14.

Happy 41st anniversary to Dave and Carolyn Wil­liams on July 11.

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