POCKET SCREWS

The Family Handyman - - BEST PRO TIPS -

You can get a ba­sic pocket hole kit for about $30. You’ll need a sup­ply of dif­fer­ent lengths of spe­cial self­drilling washer-head screws (coarse threads for soft­woods, fine threads for hard­woods).

You likely al­ready have a drill/ driver, which is the only nec­es­sary tool. That’s a big plus—it saves you money as well as space in your shop. Once you’ve be­come a con­vert, you can pick up more clamps, ac­ces­sories and jigs to re­ally step up your pro­duc­tion. The only down­side to pocket screws is that with­out spe­cial clamps, they don’t au­to­mat­i­cally align parts dur­ing as­sem­bly.

PROS

Fast No large clamps re­quired Bench­top or por­ta­ble

CONS

Vis­i­ble holes Parts align­ment not au­to­matic

1. DRILL THE HOLES

Clamp your work­piece in the jig and drill the steeply an­gled holes. This un­usual jig has two pairs of holes: one pair for thin­ner stock and one pair for thicker. It costs about $65 at har­bor­freight.com. The in­cluded drill bit bores a flat-bot­tom hole with a short pi­lot hole at the cen­ter to guide the screw into the ad­join­ing part. A stop col­lar reg­u­lates the hole depth.

2. DRIVE THE SCREWS

Ap­ply glue, clamp the parts into align­ment and drive the screws. Some pocket hole jigs are por­ta­ble; you can clamp them onto a work­piece that’s too large to put on your work­bench.

Screws Stop col­lar Pocket holes

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