WHICH FIN­ISHES ARE FOOD-SAFE?

The Family Handyman - - HOME CARE+ REPAIR - BRAD HOLDEN, AS­SO­CIATE ED­I­TOR

The short an­swer is, all of them. Some fin­ishes used to con­tain lead as a drier, but that was banned years ago. The key is to al­low fin­ishes to fully cure, which takes up to 30 days. There are es­sen­tially two types of fin­ish: oil, which pen­e­trates the wood, and film form­ing, which lies on top of the wood.

If your wooden bowl or cut­ting board gets rough treat­ment with knives and uten­sils, use an oil fin­ish like tung, min­eral, lin­seed, or even an edi­ble oil, such as olive or wal­nut oil. Just re­fresh the fin­ish as needed with an­other coat of oil. Film fin­ishes de­velop cracks with heavy use. These cracks al­low wa­ter to get into the wood but don’t al­low easy es­cape, and re­fin­ish­ing in­volves sand­ing the whole piece back to bare wood. If your item isn’t used for cut­ting, a film fin­ish is fine.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.