Book a trip to some page-turn­ing venues

The Fresno Bee (Sunday) - - Spotlight - BY LYNN O’ROURKE HAYES Fam­i­lyTravel.com

A good book can trans­port us to mag­i­cal places and en­cour­age ex­plo­ration. Here are five ex­am­ples that may in­spire your trav­els.

1. The sto­ries of Jack Lon­don, Glen Ellen, Calif.: Chan­nel the ad­ven­ture­some spirit of one of the planet’s most in­spired writ­ers as you ex­plore more than 26 miles of hik­ing, horse­back and cycling trails across 1,400 acres in the stun­ning Sonoma Val­ley. Visit the stone barn and the home where Lon­don wrote his page-turn­ers. The au­thor of “Call of the Wild” and “White Fang” was laid to rest on this land­scape that nur­tured his creativ­ity and drive. It is now a Na­tional His­toric Land­mark. Con­tact: www.jack­lon­don­park.com

2. A.A. Milne’s Win­nie the Pooh, Win­nipeg, Man­i­toba: A cen­tury ago, a Cana­dian soldier launched a lit­er­ary legacy when he adopted a black bear cub and named it af­ter his home­town of Win­nipeg. The soldier took the cub across the pond and even­tu­ally do­nated it to the Lon­don Zoo, where Win­nie be­came the in­spi­ra­tion for the well-loved char­ac­ter. To­day, Win­nipeg’s Pavil­ion Gallery Mu­seum houses a per­ma­nent col­lec­tion of Win­nie the Pooh ar­ti­facts and mem­o­ra­bilia, in­clud­ing a paint­ing by the book’s orig­i­nal il­lus­tra­tor. Con­tact: www.tourismwin­nipeg.com

3. Louisa May Al­cott, Con­cord, Mass.: To­day we can visit the home of this nov­el­ist who crafted a com­pelling story around the re­la­tion­ships within her own fam­ily. You’ll take a guided tour and get a glimpse into how the Marche fam­ily lived in the home known as Or­chard House. Many of the fam­ily’s trea­sures re­main in the well-pre­served struc­ture, in­clud­ing fam­ily china and pho­to­graphs. You’ll find out why the Al­cotts kept daily diaries and visit Louisa’s bed­room where the shelf desk, upon which she wrote “Lit­tle Women,” still re­mains. Con­tact: www.louisamay­al­cott.org

4. Zane Grey’s Amer­ica: Best-sell­ing nov­el­ist and avid an­gler Zane Grey cre­ated ro­bust sto­ries de­tail­ing the life and cul­ture of the Amer­i­can West. Through ti­tles like “Call of the Canyon,” “Rid­ers of the Purple Sage” and “The Thun­der­ing Herd,” Grey’s tales of fron­tier char­ac­ter and ro­mance in­spired many to ex­plore new coun­try. His books in­volve ev­ery state west of the Mis­souri River ex­cept North Dakota. Visit his birth­place in Zanesville, Ohio, a town founded by his mother’s an­ces­tors. You can also visit a replica of his Ari­zona cabin (the orig­i­nal burned in a 1990 wild­fire), which served as his home base while ex­plor­ing and writ­ing. Con­tact: www.rim­coun­try­mu­se­ums.com, nps.gov/upde/his­to­rycul­ture/zane­grey.htm

5 Where the Wild Things Are: Why not use this pop­u­lar and cre­ative tome as the cen­ter­piece of a wild and won­der­ful week­end with the kids? Read Mau­rice Sen­dak’s book, then visit your lo­cal zoo or wildlife park, or walk through a nearby for­est and dis­cuss the ad­ven­tures of young Max, the main char­ac­ter. Top off the week­end by stream­ing the Spike Jonze movie of the same name. The whole fam­ily will en­joy the mix of real ac­tors, com­puter an­i­ma­tion and live pup­peteer­ing, the com­bi­na­tion of which brings the story to life. Let the wild rum­pus be­gin! Con­tact: Net­flix.com.

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