IN­SUR­ANCE MAN­DATE COULD GO TOO FAR

The Kansas City Star (Sunday) - - OPINION -

For the first time in Amer­i­can his­tory, the fed­eral gov­ern­ment has de­cided that ev­ery man, woman and child must do more than sim­ply mind his own busi­ness.

Upon the threat of fine, each Amer­i­can now must go out and buy health in­sur­ance un­der the bill signed Tues­day by Pres­i­dent Obama.

This in­di­vid­ual man­date may fi­nally be a bridge too far. In re­cent years, the Supreme Court has put an end to Congress’ blank check on do­mes­tic reg­u­la­tion.

In 1995’s United States v. Lopez, the jus­tices held that Congress could not ban gun pos­ses­sion in school zones as a reg­u­la­tion of in­ter­state com­merce. In 2000, United States v. Mor­ri­son went even fur­ther in strik­ing down parts of the fed­eral Vi­o­lence Against Women Act.

If the court were to al­low Congress to go so far, Chief Jus­tice William Rehn­quist wor­ried, there would be no log­i­cal stop­ping point. The fed­eral gov­ern­ment would have power over ev­ery­thing.

The court has never up­held a fed­eral law that pun­ishes Amer­i­cans for ex­er­cis­ing their God-given right to do ab­so­lutely noth­ing. For­mer Jus­tice Depart­ment of­fi­cial John Yoo, in the Philadel­phia Inquirer.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.