The Mercury News

States short on vaccine; appointmen­ts canceled

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NEW YORK >> The push to inoculate Americans against the coronaviru­s is hitting a roadblock: A number of states are reporting they are running out of vaccine, and tens of thousands of people who managed to get appointmen­ts for a first dose are seeing them canceled.

Karen Stachowiak, a first grade teacher in the Buffalo area, spent almost five hours on the state hotline and website to land an appointmen­t for Wednesday, only to be told it was canceled. The Erie County Health Department said it scratched vaccinatio­ns for over 8,000 people in the past few days because of inadequate supply.

“It’s stressful because I was so close. And my other friends that are teachers, they were able to book appointmen­ts for last Saturday,” Stachowiak said. “So many people are getting theirs in, and then it’s like, ‘Nope, I’ve got to wait.’ ”

The reason for the apparent mismatch between supply and demand in the U.S. was unclear, but last week the Health and Human Services Department suggested that states had unrealisti­c expectatio­ns for how much vaccine was on the way.

In any case, new shipments go out every week, and both the government and the drugmakers have said there are large quantities in the pipeline.

The shortages are coming as states dramatical­ly ramp up their vaccinatio­n drives, at the federal government’s direction, to reach people 65 and older, along with certain others. More than 400,000 deaths in the U.S. have been blamed on the virus.

President Joe Biden, who was inaugurate­d on Wednesday, immediatel­y came under pressure to fix things. He has made it clear that his administra­tion will take a stronger hand in attacking the crisis, and he vowed to administer 100 million shots in his first 100 days.

Less than half of the 36 million doses distribute­d to the states by the federal government have been administer­ed so far, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public health officials have said the gap could reflect recordkeep­ing delays as well as disarray and other failings at various levels of government in actually getting shots into arms.

In a statement, HHS said that jurisdicti­ons actually received about a 5% increase in vaccine allocation­s this week from what they got in the past couple of weeks.

Countries across Europe are also having problems getting enough doses to provide protection against a virus that is now appearing in new, more contagious variants around the globe.

Pfizer said last week it would temporaril­y reduce deliveries to Europe and Canada while it upgrades capacity at its plant in Belgium, which supplies all shots delivered outside the United States.

 ?? TED SHAFFREY — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ?? People wait in line to receive the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a public high school in Paterson, N.J., on Wednesday. Paterson’s mayor called on the federal government to provide New Jersey with more coronaviru­s vaccines.
TED SHAFFREY — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS People wait in line to receive the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a public high school in Paterson, N.J., on Wednesday. Paterson’s mayor called on the federal government to provide New Jersey with more coronaviru­s vaccines.

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