After tax law, Florida sees movers but not from New York

The Saratogian (Saratoga, NY) - - FRONT PAGE - By Mike Sch­nei­der

OR­LANDO, FLA. >> In the first few months after the new fed­eral tax law went into ef­fect, Florida saw jumps in new res­i­dents mov­ing from Con­necti­cut and Mas­sachusetts.

There were smaller yearover-year in­creases in new Florida res­i­dents from New Jersey and Penn­syl­va­nia, but no jump from New York — tra­di­tion­ally the big­gest source of new Florid­i­ans.

New fig­ures re­leased Thurs­day by the U.S. Cen­sus Bureau of­fer a glimpse of the im­pact of the 2017 tax law on U.S. mi­gra­tion pat­terns from high­tax north­east­ern states to Florida, which doesn’t have a state in­come tax and has com­par­a­tively low prop­erty taxes.

Whether the tax law got peo­ple to move to Florida is still open to de­bate. The fig­ures track mi­gra­tion from July 2017 to July 2018 and cap­ture the first few months after the tax law took ef­fect on Jan. 1, 2018. Florida’s most fa­mous new res­i­dent isn’t in­cluded since Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump, an ex-New Yorker, only re­cently made Palm Beach, Florida, his per­ma­nent home.

The fed­eral tax law, which has be­come a po­lit­i­cal foot­ball be­tween Re­pub­li­can and Demo­cratic politi­cians, put a $10,000 cap on state and lo­cal tax de­duc­tions and in­sti­tuted a $750,000 limit on the amount of mort­gage debt FLORIDA >> PAGE 2

LYNNE SLADKY — THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS FILE

A for sale sign is posted in front of a home in Mi­ami. In this first few months after the new fed­eral tax law went into ef­fect, Florida saw jumps in new res­i­dents mov­ing from Con­necti­cut and Mas­sachusetts. New fig­ures re­leased Thurs­day by the U.S. Cen­sus Bureau of­fer a glimpse of the im­pact of the 2017 tax law on U.S. mi­gra­tion pat­terns from high-tax north­east­ern states to Florida, which doesn’t have a state in­come tax and has low prop­erty taxes.

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