FIVE TIPS for PER­MA­NENT WEIGHT LOSS

The Sentinel-Record - HER - Hot Springs - - Contents -

EX­ER­CISE & WEIGHT TRAIN­ING

Ex­er­cise is the most im­por­tant pre­dic­tor of whether you will suc­ceed at long term weight loss. Pick an ac­tiv­ity that you can en­joy and do it reg­u­larly. The more mus­cle tis­sue you have, the more calo­ries you burn. While aer­o­bic ac­tiv­ity can help burn calo­ries, build­ing mus­cle gives your me­tab­o­lism a sig­nif­i­cant boost even when you are at rest.

LOSE WEIGHT SLOWLY WITH SMALL CHANGES

Quick weight loss comes from wa­ter and mus­cle, not fat. Mus­cle tis­sue is crit­i­cal in keep­ing our me­tab­o­lism el­e­vated. Los­ing mus­cle leads to a de­crease in the calo­ries we need to con­sume. One pound is equiv­a­lent to 3500 calo­ries. By re­duc­ing your daily in­take by 250 calo­ries and ex­pend­ing 250 ad­di­tional calo­ries from ex­er­cise you can lose one pound (of mostly fat) per week.

FIND OUT WHY YOU OVEREAT

Of­ten overeat­ing is trig­gered by stress, bore­dom, lone­li­ness, anger de­pres­sion and other emo­tions. Learn­ing to cope with your emo­tions with­out food in­creases your abil­ity to keep the weight off. A food di­ary keeps you fo­cused and com­mit­ted to your goal. Each time you eat, record your hunger level, what, and how much you have eaten. Study pat­terns that emerge iden­tify where you can make changes.

POR­TION CON­TROL AND SPEED OF EAT­ING

With the ad­vent of “su­per size” meals and in­creas­ing large por­tions at res­tau­rants, our con­cept of nor­mal serv­ing sizes has been dis­torted. Be mind­ful of the amounts of food you con­sume at a sit­ting. When nec­es­sary, be­fore eat­ing, di­vide your food in half and ask for a take home bag. It takes the brain 20 min­utes to start sig­nal­ing that you are full. The amount of calo­ries con­sumed be­fore you feel full varies de­pend­ing on how quickly you eat. Slow down, take smaller bites, chew and sa­vor ev­ery tasty morsel.

RE­DUCE FAT WISELY

Fats con­tain 9 calo­ries per gram while pro­tein and carbs con­tain 4 calo­ries per gram. This can be con­strued to mean that you can eat un­lim­ited amounts of fat-free foods, yet if you eat more calo­ries than your body uses, you will gain weight. Eat­ing less fat will help you lose weight but re­plac­ing that fat with ex­ces­sive amounts of fat-free foods will not.

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