Who says politi­cians can’t lower our ex­pec­ta­tions?

The Standard Journal - - POLICE & FIRE - CHAR­LIE SEWELL

Just when you think ex­pec­ta­tions can go no lower in pol­i­tics, our gu­ber­na­to­rial can­di­dates con­tinue to prove us wrong. Here we sit, about to put our col­lec­tive fu­ture into the hands of a new chief ex­ec­u­tive of the eighth largest state in the na­tion and what do we have from which to se­lect? A guy that would kiss a goat if he thought it would get him elected; a gun-totin’ good ol’ boy who wants to make sure no­body don’t mess with his dadgum fam­ily and an ul­tra-lib­eral black woman who wants to sand­blast Stone Moun­tain. Good grief.

The re­cent rev­e­la­tion by Repub­li­can gu­ber­na­to­rial can­di­date Lt. Gov. Casey Ca­gle that he pushed for pas­sage of a bill he con­sid­ered bad public pol­icy in or­der to keep the Wal­ton Foun­da­tion from pour­ing mil­lions of dol­lars into the cam­paign of ri­val can­di­date, Hunter Hill, pretty much got a shrug from vot­ers if my reader mail is any in­di­ca­tion.

Not that you ap­proved of what he con­fessed to in a se­cretly recorded con­ver­sa­tion with for­mer Repub­li­can gu­ber­na­to­rial can­di­date Clay Tip­pins but, rather, it was just an­other ex­am­ple of a politi­cian be­ing a politi­cian. Like, what’s new?

Casey Ca­gle is Ge­or­gia’s Te­flon man. He com­pro­mised his in­tegrity, screwed public schools and our hard-work­ing and un­ap­pre­ci­ated school­teach­ers, said a bunch of stuff he would have been bet­ter served to have winked or nod­ded and of­fered no apolo­gies. And he seems to have got­ten away with it.

The At­lanta news­pa­pers are re­port­ing now that Ca­gle reg­u­larly uses state planes to ferry him be­tween his home in Gainesville and the state capi­tol 55 miles away. Neat. We tax­pay­ers fund his air­plane trips (over a quar­ter of a mil­lion dol­lars dur­ing the past eight years) while we buy our own gas for our own cars to ferry our own selves from one place to an­other in­clud­ing on oc­ca­sion, Gainesville.

And then there is his op­po­nent in the Repub­li­can pri­mary runoff, Sec­re­tary of State Brian “Hee-Haw” Kemp. He wants to be sure we know he has a gun and he is will­ing to use it, fer dern sure. If some young whip­per­snap­per makes eyes at his daugh­ters, he’ll fill ’em full of lead, by cracky.

I’m sure that corn­pone stuff de­lights his sup­port­ers no end, but a lot of peo­ple who are slightly nau­seous of Casey Ca­gle’s po­lit­i­cal be­hav­ior have asked my opin­ion about Kemp’s stand on the is­sues. They know he likes guns, but how would he gov­ern? Shoot any­body who dis­agrees with him? What are his views on the sub­stan­tive mat­ters that im­pact our daily lives? Is he as anti-public ed­u­ca­tion and pro-voucher as are most of his col­leagues? I’m not about to ask him. Never rile a good ol’ boy with a shot­gun in his lap. He’s just li­able to use the goldarn thing.

Abrams makes a big point of say­ing she wants to sand­blast the Con­fed­er­ate Me­mo­rial off Stone Moun­tain. Oh, please. She might want to check the state statute that pro­hibits such an ac­tion and would take an act of the Leg­is­la­ture to change it. On the ex­treme out­side chance she was elected gov­er­nor, the Repub­li­can-dom­i­nated Leg­is­la­ture wouldn’t give her the time of day, let alone change the law.

No mat­ter how things play out be­tween Casey Ca­gle and Brian Kemp, it is a fore­gone con­clu­sion that who­ever wins the Repub­li­can runoff on July 24 is des­tined to be our next gov­er­nor. That is be­cause the Demo­cratic can­di­date, Stacey Abrams, while the dar­ling of the na­tional me­dia, is too far left for the ma­jor­ity of Ge­or­gians and shows scant in­ter­est for those in the mid­dle. Plus, there is the small mat­ter of back taxes. If she can’t man­age her own fi­nances, how can we ex­pect her to man­age the state’s $25 bil­lion bud­get?

Abrams makes a big point of say­ing she wants to sand­blast the Con­fed­er­ate Me­mo­rial off Stone Moun­tain. Oh, please. She might want to check the state statute that pro­hibits such an ac­tion and would take an act of the Leg­is­la­ture to change it. On the ex­treme out­side chance she was elected gov­er­nor, the Repub­li­can-dom­i­nated Leg­is­la­ture wouldn’t give her the time of day, let alone change the law.

You might want to be seated for this one. I be­lieve if Ja­son Carter had cho­sen to run this time around, he would have had a good chance of be­ing elected. Yes, Ja­son Carter, grand­son of the man about whom my feel­ings are well-known. The for­mer Demo­cratic state se­na­tor lost to Gov. Nathan Deal in 2014 but ran a good race. I’m sur­prised he didn’t have an­other go at it this time around. In­stead, he has cho­sen to run the Carter Cen­ter. He’s a good man.

So, who are we left with to choose for our next gov­er­nor? A goat-kisser, Yosemite Sam and a po­ten­tial suc­ces­sor to our Am­bas­sador to Outer Space, Cyn­thia McKin­ney. Who said politi­cians couldn’t lower our ex­pec­ta­tions? Not me.

You can reach Dick Yar­brough at [email protected]­yarbrough.com; at P.O. Box 725373, At­lanta, Ge­or­gia, 31139 or on Face­book at

www.face­book.com/dick­yarb.

Yar­brough

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