The Star Democrat

California governor denies RFK assassin Sirhan Sirhan parole

- By DON THOMPSON

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. (AP) — California’s governor on Thursday rejected releasing Robert F. Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan from prison more than a half-century after the 1968 slaying that the governor called one of America’s “most notorious crimes.”

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who has cited RFK as his political hero, rejected a recommenda­tion from a two-person panel of parole commission­ers. Newsom said Sirhan even at age 77 poses an unreasonab­le threat to public safety.

“Mr. Sirhan’s assassinat­ion of Senator Kennedy is among the most notorious crimes in American history,” Newsom wrote in his decision.

Aside from causing Kennedy’s then-pregnant wife and 10 children “immeasurab­le suffering,” Newsom said the slaying “also caused great harm to the American people.”

It “upended the 1968 presidenti­al election, leaving millions in the United States and beyond mourning the promise of his candidacy,” Newsom wrote. “Mr. Sirhan killed Senator Kennedy during a dark season of political assassinat­ions, just nine weeks after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s murder and four and a half years after the murder of Senator Kennedy’s brother, President John F. Kennedy.”

He said Sirhan still lacks insight, refuses to accept responsibi­lity and has failed to disclaim violence committed in his name.

“These gaps in Mr. Sirhan’s insight have a close nexus to his current risk of inciting further political violence,” Newsom wrote.

Robert Kennedy, the U.S. senator from New York, was shot moments after he claimed victor y in California’s pivotal Democratic presidenti­al primary. Five others were wounded during the assassinat­ion at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

Sirhan will be scheduled for a new parole hearing no later than February 2023.

Sirhan will ask a judge to overturn Newsom’s denial, said his defense attorney, Angela Berry.

“We fully expect that judicial review of the governor’s decision will show that the governor got it wrong,” she said.

State law holds that inmates are supposed to be paroled unless they pose a current unreasonab­le public safety risk, she said, adding that “not an iota of evidence exists to suggest Mr. Sirhan is still a danger to society.”

She said the parole process has become politicize­d and Newsom “chose to overrule his own experts (on the parole board), ignoring the law.”

Newsom, a Democrat, is seeking reelection this year after handily defeating an effort last year to recall him in mid-term.

Parole commission­ers found Sirhan suitable for release “because of his impressive extensive record of rehabilita­tion over the last half-century,” Berry said. “Since the mid-1980’s Mr. Sirhan has consistent­ly been found by prison psychologi­sts and psychiatri­sts to not pose an unreasonab­le risk of danger to the public.”

During his parole hearing, the white-haired Sirhan called Kennedy “the hope of the world.” But he stopped short of taking full responsibi­lity for a shooting he said he doesn’t recall because he was drunk.

“It pains me ... the knowledge for such a horrible deed, if I did in fact do that,”

Sirhan said.

Kennedy’s widow, Ethel, and six of his children hailed Newsom’s decision in a statement that called RFK a “visionary and champion of justice” whose life “was cut short by an enraged man with a small gun.”

“The political passions that motivated this inmate’s act still simmer today, and his refusal to admit the truth makes it impossible to conclude that he has overcome the evil that boiled over 53 years ago,” they wrote.

The parole panel’s recommenda­tion in August to release Sirhan divided the iconic Kennedy family, with two of RFK’s sons — Douglas Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. — supporting his release.

The panel’s decision was based in part on several new California laws since he was denied parole in 2016 — the 15th time he’d lost his bid for release.

Commission­ers were required to consider that Sirhan committed his crime at a young age, when he was 24; that he now is elderly; and that the Christian Palestinia­n who immigrated from Jordan had suffered childhood trauma from the conflict in the Middle East.

In addition, Los Angeles County prosecutor­s didn’t object to his parole, following District Attorney George Gascón’s policy that prosecutor­s should not be involved in deciding whether prisoners are ready for release.

The decision had a personal element for Newsom, a fellow Democrat, who displays RFK photos in his official and home offices. One of them is of Kennedy with Newsom’s late father.

Sirhan originally was sentenced to death, but that sentence was commuted to life when the California Supreme Court briefly outlawed capital punishment in 1972.

 ?? AP PHOTO/GREGORY BULL, POOL, FILE ?? FILE — Sirhan Sirhan reacts during a parole hearing on Feb. 10, 2016, at the Richard J. Donovan Correction­al Facility in San Diego. California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, rejected releasing Robert F. Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan from prison more than a half-century after the 1968 slaying left a deep wound during one of America’s darkest times.
AP PHOTO/GREGORY BULL, POOL, FILE FILE — Sirhan Sirhan reacts during a parole hearing on Feb. 10, 2016, at the Richard J. Donovan Correction­al Facility in San Diego. California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, rejected releasing Robert F. Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan from prison more than a half-century after the 1968 slaying left a deep wound during one of America’s darkest times.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from United States