The Times-Tribune

Obama bans new oil leases

Atlantic and Arctic areas off limits

- BY KEVIN FREKING

HONOLULU — President Barack Obama on Tuesday designated the bulk of U.S. owned waters in the Arctic Ocean and certain areas in the Atlantic Ocean as indefinite­ly off limits to future oil and gas leasing.

The move helps put some finishing touches on Mr. Obama’s environmen­tal legacy while also testing Presidente­lect Donald Trump’s promise to unleash the nation’s untapped energy reserves.

The White House announced the actions in conjunctio­n with the government of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, which also placed a moratorium on new oil and gas leasing in its Arctic waters, subject to periodic review.

Mr. Obama is making use of an arcane provision in a 1953 law to ban offshore leases in the waters permanentl­y. The statute says that “the president of the United States may, from time to time, withdraw from dispositio­n any of the unleased lands of the outer Continenta­l Shelf.”

Environmen­tal groups hope the ban, despite relying on executive powers, will be difficult for future presidents to reverse. The White House said it’s confident the president’s order will withstand legal challenge and said the language of the statute provides no authority for subsequent presidents to undo permanent withdrawal­s.

The Atlantic waters placed off limits to new oil and gas leasing are 31 canyons stretching off the coast of New England south to Virginia, though some had hoped for a more extensive ban that would have extended farther south.

Existing leases aren’t affected by the president’s executive actions.

The administra­tion cited environmen­tal concerns in both regions to justify the moratorium. Mr. Obama also cited the importance of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas in providing subsistenc­e for native Alaskans and the vulnerabil­ity of the ecosystem to an oil spill to justify his directive.

Mr. Obama also noted the level of fuel production occurring in the Arctic. Mr. Obama said just 0.1 percent of offshore crude production came from the Arctic in 2015, and at current oil prices, significan­t production would not occur in future decades.

“That’s why looking forward, we must continue to focus on economic empowermen­t for Arctic communitie­s beyond this one sector,” Mr. Obama said.

Still, industry officials objected to Mr. Obama’s memorandum, calling it “last minute political rhetoric.”

“Instead of building on our nation’s position as a global energy leader, today’s unilateral mandate could put America back on a path of energy dependence for decades to come,” said Dan Naatz of the Independen­t Petroleum Associatio­n of America.

And Alaska Gov. Bill Walker, an independen­t, said Mr. Obama’s move marginaliz­ed local voices. He said no one is more invested than Alaskans in making sure Arctic habitats are protected.

In issuing a permanent ban, Mr. Obama appears to be trying to tie the hands of his successor. Mr. Trump has vowed a domestic energy revolution and is filling his Cabinet with nominees deeply opposed to Mr. Obama’s environmen­tal and climate change actions.

 ?? ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE ?? The oil drilling rig Polar Pioneer is towed in May 2015 toward a dock in Elliott Bay in Seattle. The rig was the first of two drilling rigs Royal Dutch Shell was outfitting for Arctic oil exploratio­n.
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE The oil drilling rig Polar Pioneer is towed in May 2015 toward a dock in Elliott Bay in Seattle. The rig was the first of two drilling rigs Royal Dutch Shell was outfitting for Arctic oil exploratio­n.

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