The Times-Tribune

Rare celestial event visible from city

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Jack Davies, 9, of Moosic, uses a telescope with a solar filter behind West Scranton High School on Monday to view the planet Mercury as it moves across the face of the sun. The eastern United States and Canada got the whole 5½-hour show. See “Mercury skips across sun’s glare” on Health & science,

Mercury skipped across the vast, glaring face of the sun Monday in a rare celestial transit.

Stargazers used solar-filtered binoculars and telescopes to spot Mercury — a tiny black dot — as it passed directly between Earth and the sun.

The eastern U.S. and Canada got the whole 5½-hour show, weather permitting, along with Central and South America.

Mercury is the solar system’s smallest, innermost planet. The next transit isn’t until 2032, and North America won’t get another shot until 2049.

 ?? CHRISTOPHE­R DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPH­ER ??
CHRISTOPHE­R DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPH­ER

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