Re­spect.

Queen of Soul was voice of an Amer­i­can era

The Tribune (SLO) - - Front Page - BY JON PARE­LES

Aretha Franklin, uni­ver­sally ac­claimed as the “Queen of Soul” and one of Amer­ica’s great­est singers in any style, died Thurs­day at her home in Detroit. She was 76.

The cause was ad­vanced pan­cre­atic can­cer, her pub­li­cist, Gwen­dolyn Quinn, said.

In her in­deli­ble late-1960s hits, Franklin brought the right­eous fer­vor of gospel mu­sic to sec­u­lar songs that were about much more than ro­mance. Hits like “Do Right Woman – Do Right Man,” “Think,” “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Nat­u­ral Woman” and “Chain of Fools” de­fined a mod­ern fe­male archetype: sen­sual and strong, long- suf­fer­ing but ul­ti­mately in­domitable, lov­ing but not to be taken for granted.

When Franklin sang “Re­spect,” the Otis Red­ding song that be­came her sig­na­ture, it was never just about how a woman wanted to be greeted by a spouse com­ing home from work. It was a de­mand for equal­ity and free­dom and a harbinger of fem­i­nism, car­ried by a voice that would ac­cept noth­ing less.

Franklin had a grandly cel­e­brated ca­reer. She placed more than 100 sin­gles in the Bill­board charts, in­clud­ing 17 Top 10 pop sin­gles and 20 No. 1 R&B hits. She re­ceived 18 com­pet­i­tive Grammy Awards, along with a life­time achieve­ment award in 1994. She was the first woman in­ducted into the Rock

ARETHA IS A GIFT FROM GOD. WHEN IT COMES TO EX­PRESS­ING YOUR­SELF THROUGH SONG, THERE IS NO ONE WHO CAN TOUCH HER. SHE IS THE REA­SON WHY WOMEN WANT TO SING. Mary J. Blige

RICHARD TER­MINE NYT

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