The Washington Post

A serious athletic oversight

- Gordon Rice, Fairfax

I enjoyed The Post’s coverage of the Olympics in July and August. The stories of the Olympians were just the right positive touch to counter the negativity of these times. I looked forward to more stories of triumph with the Paralympic Games, but alas, there were few to be found. I have watched some of the Paralympic television coverage, including the U.S. gold-medal win for Brad Snyder, a visually impaired man in the triathlon, and the U.S. gold and bronze medals, respective­ly, of Susannah Scaroni and Tatyana McFadden (winning her 18th Paralympic medal), in the 5000m women’s wheelchair races, and these were quite exciting.

I don’t understand why The Post’s coverage has been abysmal. It strikes me as ableist to not cover these athletes, some of whom have overcome even tougher obstacles than our “normally abled” athletes.

Mona Ellis, Silver Spring

For two weeks, thousands of world-class athletes from around the globe competed in dozens of events at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games. American athletes, such as Anastasia Pagonis, Gia Pergolini, Breanna Clark and Nick Mayhugh (from Fairfax), smashed world records while winning gold medals.

But you’d never know it by reading the Sports section. In stark contrast with the extensive coverage that The Post provided for the recently concluded 2020 Olympic Games, for the Paralympic­s, it provided practicall­y none.

This failure is an insult to the athletes, an affront to people with disabiliti­es and a disservice to The Post’s readers. So much for The Post’s purported “commit[ment] to building a stronger culture of diversity and equity.”

Marc Fiedler, Washington

I am dismayed and disappoint­ed that The Post has provided very limited coverage of the Paralympic­s. These athletes are incredible to watch; their triumphs just to get to compete (win or lose) should be seen by everyone. The Post should have at least published event results and showcased some of these heroes.

 ?? NAOMI BAKER/GETTY IMAGES ?? U.S. gold medalists Noah Malone, Brittni Mason, Nick Mayhugh and Tatyana Mcfadden pose in Tokyo on Sept. 4.
NAOMI BAKER/GETTY IMAGES U.S. gold medalists Noah Malone, Brittni Mason, Nick Mayhugh and Tatyana Mcfadden pose in Tokyo on Sept. 4.

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