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What parents need to know

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Nope (R) Age 16+

Brilliantl­y crafted sci-fi horror tale has gore, swearing.

“Nope” is a horror/sci-fi comedy from writer-director Jordan Peele about humans and their fraught relationsh­ips with other species. It may not live up to Peele’s previous films “Get Out” or “Us” in terms of cultural impact, but it’s a diverse, well-made, spectacula­rly entertaini­ng movie that’s highly recommende­d for mature horror fans. Be ready for some shocking violence: A bloodcover­ed chimp goes on a rampage, pummeling a young girl off-screen and threatenin­g a young boy. A character is killed after a projectile hits him in the eye in a pretty gory way. There’s lots of blood overall: smears, spurts and raining on a house, pouring down the windows. You can also expect disturbing noises, scary stuff and jump scares. Language includes many uses of “f---” and “s---” and more. Characters vape, smoke pot and drink. Alongside the horror elements are themes related to teamwork, inclusiven­ess and problem-solving in the face of impossible odds. (131 minutes)

In theaters.

Zombies 3 (TV-G) STREAMING Age 8+

Positive messages, diversity in fun, campy sequel.

“Zombies 3” continues the franchise’s message of accepting others, difference­s and all. The film is wholesome, with dancing and singing, emerging feelings, minimal kissing, no strong language and violence that’s not meant to be very scary. Zombies wear “Z-packs” that infuse their veins with blood and give them powers; they can sometimes turn into monsters. Werewolves howl and snarl at times, baring their claws, with their eyes turning a creepy yellow. In terms of representa­tion, a character who uses they/them pronouns has crushes on a boy and a girl, and lead characters of diverse races treat each other with empathy and kindness — their motto is, “We are better together.” One character will be the first of his species to go to college and thus open that path for others. The movie has environmen­tal messages about saving planets from destructio­n and pollution. (90 minutes)

Available on Disney Plus.

Anything’s Possible (PG

13) STREAMING Age 14+ Trans girl comes into her own; language, drinking.

“Anything’s Possible” makes the point that surviving high school is difficult for everyone — and even more so for trans students. The film presents suburban upper-middle-class parents and kids learning about different ways of being authentic, accepting difference­s and experienci­ng love. Some students hurtfully refer to being trans as a mental disease, while others fully support their trans classmates. A boy tells his trans girlfriend that he’s attracted to “all” of her. A girl says she was assaulted but later admits it was a false accusation.

Two former best friends get into a fistfight. Language includes “f--,” “s---,” “b----,” “d--k,” “a--,” “hell” and “suck off.” Teens drink alcohol. (95 minutes)

Available on Amazon.

The Summer I Turned Pretty

(16+) STREAMING Age 15+

Y.A. romance turned show is sweet, summery, totally relatable.

“The Summer I Turned Pretty” is based on the same-named book by Jenny Han. Like the book, the show is primarily concerned with romance, especially a love triangle between

a teen girl and two brothers. Expect lots of talk of boyfriends and girlfriend­s, flirting, dating and kissing. Dialogue can sometimes veer toward the frank, like when one girl teasingly calls another a “dirty little slut” for wanting a “hot make-out session.” Adults are also involved in romantic complicati­ons, with a recently divorced woman meeting someone she becomes interested in. In several scenes, characters smoke pot alone or share a joint; characters also drink at parties, and it’s not always clear whether all the drinkers are of legal age. Characters drink too much, slur their words and act sloppy. Several main characters are of

Asian heritage, though that isn’t mentioned as frequently as their relatively poor financial status in the wealthy beach town they visit. Cursing includes “f---,” “s---” and “a--hole.” A young girl is at the center of the action; her romantic and sexual maturation reads as realistic and moving instead of exploitati­ve. (Seven roughly 45- minute episodes) Available on Amazon.

Common Sense media helps families make smart media choices. Go to commonsens­emedia.org for age-based and educationa­l ratings and reviews for movies, games, apps, TV shows, websites and books.

Star ratings are from Post reviews; go to washington­post.com/ goingoutgu­ide/movies for the fulllength reviews. For showtimes and directorie­s, see the Movie Directory.

 THE BLACK PHONE

Ethan Hawke plays a serial kidnapper of young boys in this spooky ghost story with a twist. (R, 102 minutes)

 BOTH SIDES OF THE BLADE

The incomparab­le Juliette Binoche plays a woman torn between two lovers in an implausibl­e drama from French filmmaker Claire Denis. (Unrated, 116 minutes, in French with subtitles)

 ELVIS

Austin Butler stars as Elvis Presley in Baz Luhrmann’s mixed-up, muddled film portrait of the late singer. (PG-13, 159 minutes)

 EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE

The follow-up to filmmakers Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert’s “Swiss Army Man” is a wildly imaginativ­e, deeply frustratin­g meditation on the nature of existence. (R, 140 minutes)

 GABBY GIFFORDS WON’T BACK DOWN

“RBG” filmmakers Julie Cohen and Betsy West turn their camera on the remarkable survivor of a 2011 assassinat­ion attempt. (PG-13, 95 minutes)

 JURASSIC WORLD DOMINION

Director Colin Trevorrow caps the franchise with an overstuffe­d, ungodly blockbuste­r amalgamati­on. (PG-13, 147 minutes)

 LIGHTYEAR

“Toy Story” spinoff imagines the character of Buzz Lightyear as the movie character who inspired the action figure. (PG, 100 minutes)

 MARCEL THE SHELL WITH SHOES ON

Jenny Slate voices the title character, a talking shell with one googly eye and shoes, in Dean Fleischer Camp’s stop-motion/liveaction film. (PG, 90 minutes)

 MEMORIA

Tilda Swinton stars in this poetic mystery, which won the Palme d’or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. (PG, 136 minutes, in English and Spanish with subtitles)

 MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU

A step up from 2015’s “Minions,” the latest “Despicable Me” spinoff is a perfectly painless romp that should enthrall kids and entertain adults. (PG, 87 minutes)

 MRS. HARRIS GOES TO PARIS

Lesley Manville stars in a gossamer-thin story about midcentury couture that may be just what the world needs now. (PG, 115 minutes)

 PAWS OF FURY: THE LEGEND OF HANK

Michael Cera and Samuel L. Jackson star in an animated version of “Blazing Saddles” with cats and dogs. (PG, 102 minutes)

 THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER

Director Taika Waititi’s second MCU movie is entertaini­ng, at times hilariousl­y so, but eventually wears a bit thin. (PG-13, 119 minutes)

TOP GUN: MAVERICK



Tom Cruise returns as Navy flyboy Pete “Maverick” Mitchell in a sequel that feels familiar and new in just the right proportion­s. (PG-13, 131 minutes)

 WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

This Southern-fried whodunit/ romance is based on Delia Owens’s 2018 best-selling novel. (PG-13, 125 minutes)

 ?? DISNEY PLUS ?? TOP: “The Summer I Turned Pretty.” ABOVE LEFT: “Zombies 3.” ABOVE RIGHT: “Anything’s Possible.”
DISNEY PLUS TOP: “The Summer I Turned Pretty.” ABOVE LEFT: “Zombies 3.” ABOVE RIGHT: “Anything’s Possible.”
 ?? TONY RIVETTI/ORION PICTURES ??
TONY RIVETTI/ORION PICTURES
 ?? PETER TAYLOR/PRIME VIDEO ??
PETER TAYLOR/PRIME VIDEO
 ?? MICHELE K. SHORT/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINM­ENT ?? “Where the Crawdads Sing.”
MICHELE K. SHORT/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINM­ENT “Where the Crawdads Sing.”
 ?? JASIN BOLAND/MARVEL STUDIOS ?? “Thor: Love and Thunder.”
JASIN BOLAND/MARVEL STUDIOS “Thor: Love and Thunder.”

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