The Washington Post

Funk Parade

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The D.C. Funk Parade started as an anything-goes parade and celebratio­n of U Street, with marching bands and conga lines and costumed dancers banging pots and pans. Before and after the parade, there were performanc­es on outdoor stages and late-night parties at neighborho­od clubs. This year, though, the parade itself is on ice, and no streets will be closed to traffic. (Organizers the Musiciansh­ip announced earlier this year that the event is changing its name to the D.C. Funk Festival in 2023.) The Day Festival, originally scheduled for May 7 but postponed due to bad weather, features 18 artists, topped by go-go bounce beat trailblaze­rs Critical Condition Band (CCB) and the Naptown Brass Band. The focus is on four “activation areas” with music and dancing along the heart of U Street: the main stage at the African American Civil War Memorial at Vermont and U, a “soul station” with additional artists at Lee’s Flower Shop at 11th and U, a community corner with hands-on activities and a farmers market at the Reeves Center at 14th and U, and “Brews and Beats” with DJS and craft beer at Right Proper Brewing near Sixth and T streets. And if you didn’t get enough funk during the festival, an after-party begins at 5 p.m. at the Brixton.

When: Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: Various sites along the U Street corridor. A map and schedule are available on funkparade.com. Admission: Free.

 ?? BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST ?? A chalk message urges people to get in the mood before the 2015 edition of the D.C. Funk Parade.
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST A chalk message urges people to get in the mood before the 2015 edition of the D.C. Funk Parade.

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