Raise a pint!

Save room for dessert... beer

Times Chronicle & Public Spirit - - FOOD - By Emily Ryan Fill­ing: Egg wash: In­struc­tions Fill­ing: Pump­kin whipped top­ping:

T his hol­i­day sea­son, skip the usual pair­ings and treat guests to some­thing new “pies and pints.”

“I think it’s a great idea,” said Ethan Buck­man, co-owner and head brewer at Stick­man Brews in Roy­ers­ford. “Tak­ing dif­fer­ent beers and pair­ing them with dif­fer­ent pies is re­ally, re­ally cool.”

He makes it easy with a beer called Pe­can Pie, part of his Bakeshop Ale se­ries.

“It’s a cream ale base, which ba­si­cally just means a lighter beer. Ours has a lot of oats in it,” Buck­man de­scribed. “We brewed it with brown sugar, roasted pe­cans and a lit­tle bit of vanilla.”

For ap­ple pie, he rec­om­mends a stout like Obe­sity Epi­demic. Pump­kin or sweet potato? Try Drip­ping with Sub­text, a bar­relaged wild ale.

“It’s kind of a strange com­bi­na­tion,” Buck­man ad­mit­ted, “but the acid­ity of the beer cuts through the fat­ti­ness of those kind of pies, the cus­tard in­side.”

An­other op­tion: Of­fer pump­kin times two.

“I feel that the best beer to go with pump­kin pie would be a pump­kin beer,” sug­gested Joanne Le­ven­good of Manatawny Creek Brew­ery in Dou­glassville. “I per­son­ally make a choco­late pie for Thanks­giv­ing and would drink a dark stout with it, prefer­ably one brewed with choco­late.”

Her Triple C Stout “would be great.” That’s car­damom, choco­late and cof­fee.

“Any ‘dessert’ beer would go well with pie, re­ally, but peo­ple have dif­fer­ent def­i­ni­tions of dessert beer,” she added. “My idea of dessert beers would be high-al­co­hol, sweet stouts or bar­ley­wines, es­pe­cially ones aged in bour­bon or whiskey bar­rels.”

Ar­chi­tect of the Ruin, a bar­ley­wine from Round Guys Brew­ing Com­pany, com­ple­ments pump­kin pie, said Lans­dale Brew­pub chef Wes Gontarek. And for Dutch ap­ple, choose Rye Ea­gles Rye.

“With rye there’s kind of a spici­ness that comes in the grain that bal­ances well with that,” he ex­plained.

So, give pints a chance at the dessert ta­ble (and be­yond) be­cause “it’s not just a beer and burger any­more.”

Pink Lady & Friends

In­gre­di­ents Crust: 2 1/2 cups all-pur­pose flour 1 cup Crisco

1/4 tea­spoon salt

1 egg

2 tea­spoons dis­tilled white vine­gar

1/4 to 1/2 cup cold wa­ter

3 Pink Lady ap­ples 1 Cort­land ap­ple 2 Jon­agold ap­ples

1/2 cup sugar

1/4 cup light brown sugar 1/2 tea­spoon cin­na­mon Dash of salt

1/8 tea­spoon lemon zest

3 egg yolks 1 ta­ble­spoon milk

For the dough: Mix in­gre­di­ents well, roll out dough and place in pie dish. Chill be­fore fill­ing.

Peel and slice all ap­ples thin, so they will stack. Soak in cold wa­ter for about twenty min­utes with 1 ta­ble­spoon of FruitFresh. Drain and put in a large bowl. On medium-high in a heavy saucepan, cook ap­ples, both sug­ars, cin­na­mon, salt and lemon zest, stir­ring to pre­vent scorch­ing. Re­move from stove­top when ap­ples are ten­der yet still firm. Set aside to cool. Spoon into un­baked, chilled pie crust. Cover top with full crust or lat­tice, or any other pasty dec­o­ra­tions you de­sire. Whisk to­gether egg yolks and milk for egg wash. Brush on pie-crust top and any dec­o­ra­tions made from dough. Op­tion: Sprin­kle coarse sugar on top. Bake 425 de­grees for 30 min­utes cool sev­eral hours be­fore cut­ting.

RECIPE COUR­TESY OF SU­SAN BOYLE DEBARY AND AMER­I­CAN PIE COUN­CIL

At The Stroke of Mid­night Pump­kin Pie

In­gre­di­ents Crust: 1 1/4 cups all-pur­pose flour

1/2 tea­spoon salt

1/3 cup Crisco short­en­ing (cold) 3 to 5 ta­ble­spoons cold wa­ter

2 cups pump­kin puree

1 cup co­conut cream

1 cup sweet­ened con­densed milk

4 ta­ble­spoons Mal­ibu Rum 2 eggs

1/3 cup or­ganic sugar

1/2 tea­spoon salt

1 tea­spoon cin­na­mon 1/2 tea­spoon gin­ger 1/8 tea­spoon nut­meg 1/8 tea­spoon cloves

2 cups heavy whip­ping cream 1/4 cup pow­dered sugar 1 tea­spoon vanilla ex­tract

1/4 cup pump­kin puree

1/2 tea­spoon cin­na­mon

For the crust: Pre­heat oven to 350 de­grees. In a medium bowl, com­bine flour and salt. Us­ing pas­try blender, cut in the Crisco un­til par­ti­cles are size of small peas. Sprin­kle flour mix­ture with wa­ter, 1 ta­ble­spoon at a time, with a fork. Add wa­ter un­til dough is just moist enough to hold to­gether. Roll out the crust and use a knife and cut­ter to flare out the edges of the pie crust. Place the crust in pie plate, cover the edges and blind bake the pie crust for 17 to 20 min­utes. Let cool com­pletely while the fill­ing is be­ing pre­pared.

For the fill­ing: Re­duce the oven to 325 de­grees. Whisk the pump­kin, co­conut cream, sweet­ened con­densed milk, Mal­ibu Rum, eggs, sugar and salt un­til smooth and creamy. Add all the spices and whisk in gen­tly. Pour into the pre­pared crust and bake for 1 hour. Bake un­til cen­ter is al­most set but still jig­gles slightly. May need up to 15 ad­di­tional min­utes.

For the top­ping: Whip cream un­til firm and creamy. Add the pow­dered sugar and vanilla. Gen­tly fold in the pump­kin puree and cin­na­mon.

RECIPE COUR­TESY OF KATHY HAN­SON AND AMER­I­CAN PIE COUN­CIL

Easy as pie

Make this year’s pies the best yet with some tips from the Amer­i­can Pie Coun­cil.

-Read the en­tire recipe. Make sure you have all the in­gre­di­ents and uten­sils and un­der­stand all direc­tions.

-Cold in­gre­di­ents are a must. It also helps to have cold bowls and uten­sils.

-Chill the dough for at least an hour be­fore rolling. Keep­ing the short­en­ing cold en­sures a nice flaky crust!

-Cold hands will help when han­dling dough. And what­ever you do, don’t over­work it.

-Bake pies in the lower third of the oven. A crust pro­tec­tor or foil will keep edges from over­brown­ing.

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

“For pump­kin, you can go a lot of ways,” says chef Wes Gontarek on pair­ing pie and beer.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF MANATAWNY CREEK BREW­ERY

Manatawny Creek Brew­ery started brew­ing this past sum­mer.

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

So many pies, so lit­tle time!

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

Serve pies with lo­cal brews, and your guests will thank you.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF ROUND GUYS BREW­ING COM­PANY

Sip Ar­chi­tect of the Ruin with pump­kin pie.

PHOTO BY EMILY RYAN

Whether a slab pie or tra­di­tional one, there’s a beer to match.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF STICK­MAN BREWS

This beer, called Pe­can Pie, is part of the Bakeshop Ale se­ries.

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF STICK­MAN BREWS

Try pair­ing Drip­ping with Sub­text and pump­kin pie

PHOTO COUR­TESY OF STICK­MAN BREWS

Obe­sity Epi­demic works well with ap­ple pie.

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