Times-Herald (Vallejo)

Biden open to compromise on infrastruc­ture, but not inaction

- By Jo3h BoA4

President Joe Biden drew a red line on his $2.3 trillion infrastruc­ture plan Wednesday, saying he is open to compromise on how to pay for the package but inaction is unacceptab­le.

The president turned fiery in an afternoon speech, saying that the United States is failing to build, invest and research for the future and adding that failure to do so amounts to giving up on “leading the world.”

“Compromise is inevitable,” Biden said. “We’ll be open to good ideas in good faith negotiatio­ns. But here’s what we won’t be open to: We will not be open to doing nothing. Inaction, simply, is not an option.”

Biden challenged the idea that low tax rates would do more for growth than investing in care workers, roads, bridges, clean water, broadband, school buildings, the power grid, electric vehicles and veterans hospitals.

The president has taken heat from Republican lawmakers and business groups for proposing that corporate tax increases should finance an infrastruc­ture package that goes far beyond the traditiona­l focus on roads and bridges.

“What the president proposed this week is not an infrastruc­ture bill,” Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., said on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” one of many quotes that

Republican congressio­nal aides emailed to reporters before Biden’s speech. “It’s a huge tax increase, for one thing. And it’s a tax increase on small businesses, on job creators in the United States of America.”

Biden last week proposed funding his $2.3 trillion infrastruc­ture plan largely through an increase in the corporate tax rate to 28% and an expanded global minimum tax set at 21%. But he said Wednesday he was willing to accept a rate below 28% so long as the projects are financed and taxes are not increased on people making less than $400,000.

“I’m willing to listen to that,” Biden said. “But we gotta pay for this. We gotta pay for this. There’s many other ways we can do it. But I am willing to negotiate. I’ve come forward with the best, most rational way, in my view the fairest way, to pay for it, but there are many other ways as well. And I’m open.”

He stressed that he had been open to compromise on his $1.9 trillion coronaviru­s relief plan, but Republican­s never budged beyond their $600 billion counteroff­er.

“If they’d come forward with a plan that did the bulk of it and it was $1.3 billion or four ... that allowed me to have pieces of all that was in there, I would have been prepared to compromise,” Biden said. “But they didn’t. They didn’t move an inch. Not an inch.”

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