Story of the Sanc­tu­ary

Trail Rider - - RESCUE REPORT -

Rancher, nat­u­ral­ist, and au­thor Day­ton O. Hyde es­tab­lished the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanc­tu­ary in 1988. Mo­ti­vated by a need to pro­vide a per­ma­nent home to un­adopt­able wild horses, Hyde raised enough money to ac­quire 11,000 acres of land for his dream.

To­day, the sanc­tu­ary is home to ap­prox­i­mately 600 horses, most of whom live free in bands among the sanc­tu­ary’s prairies, canyons, and pine forests.

Horses come to the sanc­tu­ary from a num­ber of dif­fer­ent sit­u­a­tions, of­ten through pri­vate horse res­cues or di­rectly from the Bu­reau of Land Man­age­ment. The ma­jor­ity of horses at the sanc­tu­ary are un­wanted Amer­i­can Mus­tangs, which were orig­i­nally rounded up by the BLM as part of its Wild Horse and Burro Pro­gram.

The sanc­tu­ary is op­er­ated by the non­profit In­sti­tute of Range and Amer­i­can Mus­tangs and is also in­stru­men­tal in the preser­va­tion of rare Span­ish horses.

Al­though the ma­jor­ity of horses on the sanc­tu­ary live free, most are man­aged to en­sure their health. Horses in the sanc­tu­ary’s main part are pro­vided with sup­ple­men­tal grain year-round, along with hay dur­ing the win­ter months. De­worm­ing blocks are dis­trib­uted in the pas­tures to help keep par­a­sites at bay.

In the more re­mote canyons of the sanc­tu­ary, mus­tang herds are al­lowed to live on their own. The only hu­man in­ter­fer­ence is the cap­tur­ing and geld­ing of any colts that are born as the re­sult of a mys­te­ri­ous rogue stallion that has evaded cap­ture. The sanc­tu­ary doesn’t pur­posely al­low its Amer­i­can Mus­tangs to breed.

Vis­i­tors to the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanc­tu­ary can take group or pri­vate tours of the main part of the sanc­tu­ary or the more re­mote ar­eas, stay in a quaint cabin ad­ja­cent to the Vis­i­tors Cen­ter, eat break­fast and lunch at the Wild Horse Café and Ole Time Ice Cream Shoppe, and buy horse-re­lated items at the gift shop. The sanc­tu­ary is open to vis­i­tors year-round.

For more in­for­ma­tion, visit www. wild­mus­tangs.com

AU­DREY PAVIA PHOTO

Al­though the ma­jor­ity of horses on the sanc­tu­ary live free, most are man­aged to en­sure their health. Horses in the sanc­tu­ary’s main part are pro­vided with sup­ple­men­tal grain year-round, along with hay dur­ing the win­ter months.

AU­DREY PAVIA PHOTO

Vis­i­tors to the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanc­tu­ary can take group or pri­vate tours of the main part of the sanc­tu­ary or the more re­mote ar­eas and stay in a quaint cabin ad­ja­cent to the Vis­i­tors Cen­ter.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.