Bust­ing the “Blow Up” Myth

Trail Rider - - RIDE RIGHT WITH JULIE GOODNIGHT -

Con­trary to pop­u­lar be­lief, horses don’t “blow up” dur­ing the cinch­ing process so that the cinch isn’t tight. First of all, the cinch goes across a ring of bone, which a horse can’t re­ally ex­pand. Se­condly, horses don’t have the abil­ity to take an ac­tion now that leads to a dif­fer­ent out­come in the fu­ture.

Rather, a grad­ual loos­en­ing of the cinch may be caused by com­pres­sion of the sad­dle, sad­dle pad, your horse’s hair­coat, and mus­cle con­trac­tion as your horse works.

Horses that have been gut-wrenched (suf­fered a sud­den tight­en­ing of the cinch) will learn to flinch at any cinch tight­en­ing; this is of­ten mis­taken for “blow­ing up.” If I punched you in the stom­ach ev­ery time I walked up to you, you’d soon learn to flinch at my ap­proach.

Con­trary to pop­u­lar be­lief, horses don’t “blow up” dur­ing the cinch­ing process so that the cinch isn’t tight.

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