Tulsa World

TODAY IN HISTORY

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Today’s highlight

On Sept. 10, 1963, 20 Black students entered Alabama public schools following a standoff between federal authoritie­s and Gov. George C. Wallace. On this date

In 1608, John Smith was elected president of the Jamestown colony council in Virginia.

In 1813, an American naval force commanded by Oliver H. Perry defeated the British in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. (Afterward, Perry sent the message, “We have met the enemy and they are ours.”)

In 1919, New York City welcomed home Gen. John J. Pershing and 25,000 soldiers who’d served in the U.S. First Division during World War I.

In 1935, Sen. Huey P. Long died in Baton Rouge two days after being shot in the Louisiana state Capitol, allegedly by Dr. Carl Weiss.

In 1960, Hurricane Donna, a dangerous Category 4 storm eventually blamed for 364 deaths, struck the Florida Keys.

In 1962, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the University of Mississipp­i to admit James Meredith, a Black student. In 1984, a revival of the TV game show “Jeopardy!” hosted by Alex Trebek premiered in syndicatio­n.

In 1987, Pope John Paul II arrived in Miami, where he was welcomed by President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan as he began a 10-day tour of the United States.

In 1991, the Senate Judiciary Committee opened hearings on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1998, President Clinton met with members of his Cabinet to apologize, ask forgivenes­s and promise to improve as a person in the wake of the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

In 2005, cadaver dogs and boatloads of forensic workers fanned out across New Orleans to collect the corpses left behind by Hurricane Katrina; cleanup crews towed away abandoned cars and even began readying a hotel for reopening.

In 2015, New York State approved gradually raising the minimum wage for fast-food workers to $15 an hour — the first time any state had set the minimum that high.

Ten years ago: On the eve of the 10th anniversar­y of 9/11, former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton paid tribute to the 40 passengers and crew who fought back against their hijackers aboard Flight 93 during a ceremony dedicating the first phase of a memorial in Shanksvill­e, Pennsylvan­ia. A pair of NASA probes — named Grail-A and Grail-B — rocketed toward the moon on the first mission dedicated to measuring lunar gravity and determinin­g what was inside Earth’s orbiting companion. Oscar- and Emmy-winning actor Cliff Robertson died in Stony Brook, New York, a day after turning 88.

Five years ago: John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinat­e President Ronald Reagan in 1981, was released from a Washington mental hospital for good. Angelique Kerber won her first U.S. Open title and the second Grand Slam trophy of her

breakthrou­gh season, beating Karolina Pliskova 6-3, 4-6, 6-4.

One year ago: Authoritie­s in Oregon said more than 500,000 people statewide had been forced to leave their homes because of wildfires; the number represente­d more than 10% of the state’s population. Houston’s police chief said four officers had been terminated after an internal investigat­ion determined they did not use reasonable force when they fired their weapons 21 times at a man who

had been experienci­ng a mental health crisis, killing him in April after he was already injured and on the ground.

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