Tulsa World

An on-the-spot job offer

Tulsa World Career Fair featured 59 area companies

- TIM STANLEY Tulsa World tim.stanley@tulsaworld.com

Robert Hill had no doubt that the position would be a good fit for him.

He just never expected his interviewe­r to agree so quickly.

“She took one look at my resume and said, ‘What if I said I could hire you today?’” said Hill, who attended the Tulsa World Career Fair on Thursday and received an on-the-spot offer to become a FedEx delivery driver.

He immediatel­y accepted, he added.

“She’s gonna email me all the informatio­n I need to send in,” Hill said. “Gonna knock out the background check. I got the drug test at 9 a.m. tomorrow. I’m ready to get started.”

The fair, held in the Central Park Hall at Expo Square, was the latest hosted by Tulsa World Media Co. in partnershi­p with the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission and Green Country Workforce.

The event featured 59 area companies and organizati­ons seeking to fill job openings.

Among those represente­d were

the Broken Arrow and Union school districts; Saint Francis Health System; St. John Rehabilita­tion Hospital; Reasor’s; Walmart; and the Tulsa Police Department.

Covenant Living, which operates senior living communitie­s in Tulsa and Bixby, was looking to fill openings for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, certified nursing assistants and other positions.

Cindy Ivy, a human resources assistant, said the company was set up to do interviews on the spot.

“I can even make on-site offers,” she said.

“We are hoping to get some

good candidates today,” she added. “People that are committed to work, that are dedicated to serving senior adults.”

Ivy said the company has had good luck with career fairs in the past but hasn’t been able to do one in over a year because of the pandemic.

Workshops throughout the day were led by Kari Mirabal, a nationally known recruiter and hiring expert.

“You want to date your career, like you date in a relationsh­ip,” Mirabal told one group of job seekers in a morning session.

“So what happens when the relationsh­ip gets a little bit stale — we have to put new energy back into it. We have to look at ways to work through conflict and have conversati­ons and work through the difficult times. It’s the same thing in your career.”

Mirabal offered practical tips on interviewi­ng and resumes.

“A lot of people spend eight, nine, 10 hours on a resume. You know how long (employers) look at a resume? 10 seconds maybe,” said Mirabal.

“They skim, skim, skim. You want your resume to be customized to the job descriptio­n.”

Hill said it was his resume that helped him secure his job offer with FedEx.

He worked previously as a delivery driver for Amazon, which jumped out at his interviewe­r.

Hill, who moved to Tulsa from Chicago about a year ago, said more recently he’d been working as an online currency trader.

“Right now everything is kind of slowing down, so I decided it was time for me to find another job,” he said.

Hill said he’s thankful for his good luck Thursday and is ready to go to work.

“It was on my mind when I woke up this morning. I wanted to at least get some kind of good news today about a job,” he said.

 ?? MICHAEL NOBLE JR. PHOTOS, TULSA WORLD ?? Keynote speaker Kari Mirabal leads a workshop titled “Career Dating: Tools for Success” during the Tulsa World Career Fair at Expo Square on Thursday.
MICHAEL NOBLE JR. PHOTOS, TULSA WORLD Keynote speaker Kari Mirabal leads a workshop titled “Career Dating: Tools for Success” during the Tulsa World Career Fair at Expo Square on Thursday.
 ??  ?? Robert Hill walked in wanting a job and left with one after talking to a FedEx recruiter at the Tulsa World Career Fair on Thursday.
Robert Hill walked in wanting a job and left with one after talking to a FedEx recruiter at the Tulsa World Career Fair on Thursday.

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