Nikki Ha­ley says Rus­sia will face new sanc­tions over Syria

USA TODAY International Edition - - NEWS - John Ba­con

“We wanted (Syria’s) friends Iran and Rus­sia to know that we meant busi­ness, and that they were go­ing to be feel­ing the pain from this as well.” U.N. Am­bas­sador Nikki Ha­ley

The price Syria paid for us­ing chem­i­cal weapons on its cit­i­zens was a mil­i­tary strike. Now Rus­sia will pay an eco­nomic price for sup­port­ing the regime of Syr­ian Pres­i­dent Bashar As­sad, U.N. Am­bas­sador Nikki Ha­ley said Sun­day.

Trea­sury Sec­re­tary Steven Mnuchin will an­nounce de­tails of the sanc­tions Mon­day, Ha­ley told CBS’ Face the Na­tion.

“They will go di­rectly to any sort of com­pa­nies that were deal­ing with equip­ment re­lated to As­sad and chem­i­cal weapons use,” Ha­ley said. “We wanted their friends Iran and Rus­sia to know that we meant busi­ness, and that they were go­ing to be feel­ing the pain from this as well.”

Rus­sian Foreign Min­istry spokes­woman Maria Zakharova said Sun­day the sanc­tions are be­ing im­posed “with­out any link to any re­al­i­ties.”

“Now they pun­ish us for the mere fact of be­ing in the global arena,” she said.

Pres­i­dent Trump pre­vi­ously is­sued sanc­tions against Rus­sia in Au­gust, ac­cus­ing Pres­i­dent Vladimir Putin’s govern­ment of tam­per­ing with the 2016 U.S. pres­i­den­tial elec­tion. The leg­is­la­tion also called Putin out on hu­man rights abuses and other is­sues. The mil­i­tary strikes in Syria early Satur­day were a joint ef­fort of the U.S., France and Bri­tain.

More than 100 pre­ci­sion mis­siles tar­geted a sci­en­tific re­search cen­ter near Da­m­as­cus, a chem­i­cal weapons stor­age fa­cil­ity west of Homs and a stor­age fa­cil­ity and com­mand post near Homs.

Ha­ley stressed the U.S. was “not look­ing for war” and “not look­ing to kill peo­ple.”

“This was a very strong at­tack on the chem­i­cal weapons pro­gram,” she said.

Trump ex­pressed ela­tion on Twit­ter, de­scrib­ing the strike as “per­fectly ex­e­cuted .... Mis­sion Ac­com­plished!” Putin, how­ever, in a phone call with Ira­nian Pres­i­dent Has­san Rouhani, de­scribed the at­tack as a vi­o­la­tion of in­ter­na­tional law.

Putin said such ac­tions will in­evitably lead to “chaos” in in­ter­na­tional re­la­tions, ac­cord­ing to a read­out re­leased by the Krem­lin.

Ha­ley said As­sad was “not wor­thy” of direct talks with the U.S. But she said the United Na­tions would con­tinue to work on a diplo­matic so­lu­tion. And she said the time had come for Rus­sia and Iran to en­gage in a se­ri­ous ef­fort to bring peace to the na­tion that has been dec­i­mated by seven years of civil war.

“It’s not mov­ing near as fast as any of us want it to move, but this is a po­lit­i­cal process that needs to hap­pen.”

Some ex­perts are skep­ti­cal that the air strikes will help the po­lit­i­cal process.

“The Trump-May-Macron bom­bard­ment of Syria did not kill many peo­ple, and it has not caused World War III,” said Charles Glass, an au­thor who spe­cial­izes in the Mid­dle East. “Far from end­ing the war in Syria, it is likely to pro­long it.”

U.N. Am­bas­sador Nikki Ha­ley says the U.S. will im­pose new sanc­tions on Rus­sia that “go di­rectly to any sort of com­pa­nies that were deal­ing with equip­ment re­lated” to Syria’s pres­i­dent and chem­i­cal weapons. JA­SON SZENES/EPA-EFE

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