GROW­ING UP, LIND­SAY LO­HAN WAS THRILLE D WHEN SHE SAW HE RSE LF IN A TRASHY MAG­A­ZINE.

Variety - - Lindsay Lohan Wants Back In -

“The first time I was in a tabloid,” she says, “I was like, ‘Oh, my God, I feel like Britney Spears!’ be­cause she was in a tabloid and I felt cool. Lit­tle did I know what would hap­pen from there.”

Lo­han suf­fered one of the big­gest crashes in Hol­ly­wood his­tory. Af­ter star­ring in “The Par­ent Trap” at 12 and climb­ing onto the A-list be­cause of “Mean Girls,” she was poised to be­come one of the stars of her gen­er­a­tion. But she was held back by her own bad choices. Af­ter a stint in re­hab, Lo­han was ar­rested in 2007 for a DUI, pos­ses­sion of co­caine and a mis­de­meanor hit-an­drun. Five more ar­rests fol­lowed, along with more vis­its to re­hab, court hear­ings, jail time, house ar­rest and a neck­lace-steal­ing scan­dal. Her last the­atri­cal movie, “The Canyons,” came out six years ago, and even in­de­pen­dent direc­tors stopped cast­ing her be­cause she wouldn’t show up to set.

Lo­han, 32, has de­camped the United States for Dubai, where she lives full-time. She’s en­tered the hos­pi­tal­ity busi­ness, with three clubs in Greece and an is­land she’s de­sign­ing called Lind­say Land. Now, she’s tak­ing on an­other sur­prise job: MTV re­al­ity star. “Lind­say Lo­han’s Beach Club,” which pre­mieres Jan. 8, chron­i­cles her life in Mykonos. This lat­est rein­car­na­tion of Lind­say is more muted than what we’ve seen in the past (in­clud­ing a failed 2014 do­cuseries on OWN). In the pi­lot, Lo­han seems to be chan­nel­ing Bravo’s Lisa Van­der­pump. She wants you to see her as a con­nected en­tre­pre­neur with her own staff and hos­pi­tal­ity em­pire.

Dur­ing a re­cent rainy Fri­day af­ter­noon in down­town Man­hat­tan, Lo­han makes it clear she’s ready for a come­back and wants to star in movies again, in­clud­ing a se­quel of “Mean Girls.” She’s ner­vous about talk­ing to press, fre­quently tak­ing cig­a­rette breaks on the bal­cony of a swanky pent­house ho­tel room in Soho. On the day be­fore our interview, she reached out to her old pub­li­cist, Les­lie Sloane, be­cause she didn’t want to face jour­nal­ists on her own. Re­turn­ing to Hol­ly­wood may not be easy. One sign of how many bridges she’s burned: Sev­eral of her for­mer col­leagues de­clined to be in­ter­viewed about what it was like to work with her.

Here’s what Lo­han has to say about her new life and her fu­ture am­bi­tions. Why do you think peo­ple don’t want to hire you?

I think there’s a mis­con­cep­tion that peo­ple still have about me, and I think it’s un­for­tu­nate. Hope­fully, this will change peo­ple’s per­cep­tion once and for all. You’ve said that you wish your past would stay in the past.

And now we’re talk­ing about it again. But you’ve made many mis­takes in the pub­lic eye.

Ten years ago. I just don’t want to seem like a mar­tyr. But it’s in the past. I al­ways say to peo­ple, “You do re­al­ize that was over 10 years ago?” But it was def­i­nitely un­fair and un­just at cer­tain times, es­pe­cially as a girl. I worked at the morgue [as part of a judge’s ruling for vi­o­lat­ing pro­ba­tion af­ter al­legedly steal­ing a neck­lace]. I’ve been through the ringer. It was hor­ri­ble. But from those things, I be­came a lot stronger. Do you be­lieve that there’s a Dis­ney curse?

I don’t feel cursed. A lot of child stars have strug­gled with sub­stance abuse and other is­sues.

It was dif­fer­ent then. There was less pro­tec­tion. So maybe that was the strug­gle. Peo­ple know you so young and peo­ple are chas­ing you, and then in­stead of go­ing to col­lege, you have a month or two months off and you want to go to a club and that’s “bad.” I don’t think there’s any curse with Dis­ney. That’s just a dark thing to say. If any­thing, it was a bless­ing, be­cause we’re all still here.

Do you think there is a dou­ble stan­dard with the way women are por­trayed in the me­dia?

No. If you think about it, back when I was be­ing fol­lowed, there were more tabloids. We didn’t have In­sta­gram. We couldn’t con­trol

so­cial me­dia on our own and have our own voice. So I think times have changed.

What work does Hol­ly­wood still need to do to re­ally bring about equal­ity for women?

Stop giv­ing me shit! Stop re­hash­ing my past for no rea­son, be­cause ev­ery­thing is dif­fer­ent now.

When you think back to be­ing fol­lowed by the pa­parazzi 24/7, what do you re­mem­ber?

I think I should have just smiled at them more. But it was al­ways just so much.

Why would you want to have cam­eras fol­low­ing you for a re­al­ity show?

We were all very clear that it wasn’t go­ing to be a Lind­say Lo­han fol­low-her- ev­ery-sec­ond kind of show. It was go­ing to be me run­ning a busi­ness. It’s dif­fer­ent be­cause I’m writ­ing the script, in a sense. I have noth­ing to hide. What’s left in say­ing that I’ve gone to a club? Now I own them.

The club you own in Mykonos is on the same beach where you were phys­i­cally as­saulted by your ex-fi­ancé, Egor Tarabasov, in 2016.

I was hit and abused phys­i­cally on a beach in front of peo­ple, twice. And then at my house, and thank God a kid saw me and called the po­lice. It’s a shame that peo­ple had to see that, but it’s not some­thing that I feel is nec­es­sary to talk about. It’s some­thing that hap­pened to me, and I had to fig­ure out how to han­dle it on my own. My eff-you was buy­ing the beach.

Do you miss liv­ing in Amer­ica?

Yeah, of course. I miss see­ing my fam­ily. But my brother comes out ev­ery other month, and my sis­ter is com­ing back with me. My mom came to Mykonos, but she didn’t want to be there when I was film­ing. We make time to see each other, and I talk to them ev­ery day when I’m in Dubai at odd hours when­ever they call.

Do you still want to be an ac­tress?

Yeah, of course. I love act­ing. It’s my pas­sion. But I like be­ing be­hind the scenes. If I’m not film­ing at the mo­ment, I need to be creative some­how. I can’t just sit and do noth­ing. If I’m not on a set, then I’d rather do some­thing, so I started my own com­pany — Seven Won­ders Prods. — and I like that it’s just mine and that I don’t have to an­swer to peo­ple any­more. I can just do it my­self. It’s nice to have that power back. I want to keep act­ing and maybe di­rect­ing.

You have a supporting role in the sec­ond sea­son of the Bri­tish com­edy “Sick Note.” What other projects do you have in the works?

I’m at­tached to a movie that I’m pro­duc­ing called “Frame” that will shoot in Saudi Ara­bia, which is a re­ally in­ter­est­ing story about an Amer­i­can girl pho­tog­ra­pher who moves to teach a class in Saudi Ara­bia. We’re rais­ing the fi­nanc­ing for that. I bought a book called “The Honeymoon.” We’ll turn that into ei­ther a se­ries or film. I don’t know yet.

Do you still au­di­tion for things?

I only au­di­tioned for “The Par­ent Trap.” I would be ter­ri­fied to au­di­tion. I don’t even know what it would be like. I think I would freeze. My agent asked me to read for some­thing, and I was like, “I can’t.” I would panic. It’s such a dif­fer­ent ex­pe­ri­ence. I don’t think I could do it. Some­one asked me to au­di­tion once — it was Oliver Stone for “Sav­ages,” and I met with him and they wanted me to read, and I said, “I’m re­ally, re­ally bad at this, and I’m go­ing to for­get ev­ery­thing the sec­ond I start, so I might just ad-lib it.” And he was like, “You were great.” And I was like, “OK.” It was such a weird ex­pe­ri­ence. What are your ca­reer goals?

To work with Martin Scors­ese. Work with Spiel­berg. I don’t know. I think goals are lim­it­less, and there’s al­ways go­ing to be some­thing new that I want to do. I just want to make peo­ple happy, and I want to stay happy.

You said on your so­cial me­dia that you want to play Ariel in a live-ac­tion re­make of “The Lit­tle Mer­maid.”

“The Lit­tle Mer­maid” is my fa­vorite movie since I was a kid. When­ever I put that movie on, it makes me happy. I’m like, “Every­body, stop. Watch this movie.”

Has Dis­ney reached out to you?

No, but I’m go­ing to ha­rass my agent about it af­ter this. You also said that your dream cast would be Meryl Streep as Ur­sula. Have you talked about this with Meryl, your co-star from “A Prairie Home Com­pan­ion”?

No, I’m not in Amer­ica. I haven’t been in L.A. in a long time. But I would go for that. Would you want to do a “Mean Girls” se­quel?

If any­one has asked for this more than I have, please tell me. I’ve said it so many times, and so many peo­ple have asked me, and I think we’d have so much fun do­ing it. Tina [Fey] and Lorne [Michaels] are so amaz­ing, and to bring ev­ery­one back to­gether would be great. Last time I was in New York, I went up to Lorne, and I was like, “Please!” It’s in their hands.

Would ev­ery­one have to come back for a se­quel?

Yes. I don’t know what else you could do, un­less some­one is killed off, but that would not be “Mean Girls.” It has to be ev­ery­one.

Do you con­sider your­self a fem­i­nist? I’m just Lind­say Lo­han. Whatever that is.

Girl, In­ter­rupted Lo­han with busi­ness part­ner Panos Spent­zos

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