Early De­tec­tion & Preven­tion Are Keys To Gy­ne­co­log­i­cal Health

Wellness Update - - Contents -

The Gy­ne­co­logic Can­cer Foun­da­tion (GCF) has des­ig­nated Septem­ber as Gy­ne­co­logic Can­cer Aware­ness Month. The goal is to draw at­ten­tion to the im­por­tance of early de­tec­tion and preven­tion.

T he Gy­ne­co­logic Can­cer Foun­da­tion (GCF) has des­ig­nated Septem­ber as Gy­ne­co­logic Can­cer Aware­ness Month. The goal is to draw at­ten­tion to the im­por­tance of early de­tec­tion and preven­tion. Gy­ne­co­logic can­cers in­clude all can­cers of the fe­male re­pro­duc­tive tract. This means ovar­ian, cer­vi­cal, uter­ine, vagi­nal, vul­var, or tubal can­cer. Th­ese can­cers do not have to be fatal. Early de­tec­tion and ed­u­ca­tion tools, such as Pap tests and risk as­sess­ment tests, not only can de­tect them, but also can help pre­vent them.

4 WAYS TO TAKE CON­TROL OF YOUR GY­NE­CO­LOGIC HEALTH

The pro­gram’s goal is to show you four sim­ple ways to take con­trol of your gy­ne­co­logic health. By do­ing this, you can pro­tect your health and your life. Here’s a way to re­mem­ber the goals of Gy­ne­co­logic Can­cer Aware­ness Month.

GCGET TO KNOW YOUR FAM­ILY HIS­TORY. Learn about your fam­ily his­tory of breast, ovar­ian, uter­ine, and colon can­cers. The ge­netic risk for ovar­ian can­cer can be passed on to you through ei­ther your mother or fa­ther. This makes both fam­ily his­to­ries equally im­por­tant. Fa­mil­ial risk is the most sig­nif­i­cant risk fac­tor for ovar­ian can­cer. Alert your gy­ne­col­o­gist about your fam­ily his­tory of can­cer so you can take pre­ven­tive steps.

CON­DUCT AN ONLINE RISK AS­SESS­MENT. Take 15 min­utes out of your day to de­ter­mine your risk of de­vel­op­ing one of th­ese can­cers. Visit the Women’s Can­cer Net­work (WCN) web­site (www.wcn.org). Take the free, per­son­al­ized as­sess­ment of your risk of de­vel­op­ing cer­vi­cal, ovar­ian, uter­ine, and breast can­cer. The WCN web­site also has in­for­ma­tion on th­ese can­cers, re­sources for women who have been di­ag­nosed with can­cer, and in­for­ma­tion on can­cer ex­perts.

AMASK QUES­TIONS; ED­U­CATE YOUR­SELF ABOUT GY­NE­CO­LOGIC CAN­CER. Ed­u­cate your­self. Learn the warn­ing signs of th­ese can­cers. Know your body. This knowl­edge is an im­por­tant step to pro­tect­ing your health and well-be­ing. MAKE AN AP­POINT­MENT FOR YOUR AN­NUAL GY­NE­CO­LOGIC EXAM & CAN­CER SCREEN­ING TESTS. Get an an­nual gy­ne­co­logic exam, no mat­ter what your age. Some of th­ese can­cers have no symp­toms. They can be found only through reg­u­lar vis­its to your gy­ne­col­o­gist. This reg­u­lar health­care rou­tine is crit­i­cal to main­tain­ing your health. The So­ci­ety of Gy­ne­co­logic On­col­o­gists (SGO) is a non­profit, in­ter­na­tional or­ga­ni­za­tion made up of ob­ste­tri­cians and gyne­col­o­gists who spe­cial­ize in th­ese can­cers. Its pur­pose is to im­prove the care of women with gy­ne­co­logic can­cer, to raise the stan­dards of prac­tice, and to en­cour­age re­search. The SGO es­tab­lished the GCF in 1992 as a non­profit char­i­ta­ble or­ga­ni­za­tion, and as an ex­ten­sion of SGO’s com­mit­ment to the health and well-be­ing of women. Its goal is to raise funds for phil­an­thropic pro­grams that ben­e­fit women who have, or who are at risk of de­vel­op­ing, th­ese can­cers. This in­for­ma­tion pro­vided cour­tesy of the Univer­sity of Missouri Health Sys­tem

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