8 WAYS TO EX­PLORE THE CITY

Where Boston - - FRONT PAGE - Ex­plore the Big Dig from the Rose Kennedy Green­way

Bos­ton’s pre-Rev­o­lu­tion­ary War an­tics are no se­cret to the masses. Vis­i­tors who have been there done that on the Free­dom Trail, have time to dis­cover many other sides to this city. Here are a hand­ful of ways to get you started.

CHI­NA­TOWN MAR­KET TOURS

While Bos­ton’s Chi­na­town neigh­bor­hood has been ex­pe­ri­enc­ing some gentrification in the last decade, its Asian­based com­mu­nity thrives, cul­ti­vat­ing fes­ti­vals, food shops and dozens of restau­rants serv­ing cui­sine from all over the Far East. Th­ese tours tra­verse the tiny, but densely pop­u­lated en­clave scout­ing out bak­eries and bar­be­cue shops, her­bal phar­ma­cies, mar­kets, and more, as an in­tro­duc­tion to a lo­cal her­itage that some still call ex­otic. 617.523.6032

BOS­TON PHOTOWALKS

Am­a­teur pho­togs en­joy this quest that ed­u­cates par­tic­i­pants on how to shoot and click with en­tirely dif­fer­ent per­spec­tive, whether you spend 90 min­utes in one neigh­bor­hood or visit a few Free­dom Trail sights. No longer is a tan­gi­ble me­mento of Gra­nary Bury­ing Ground a generic snap­shot of a ceme­tery. In­stead, you learn to seek out the de­tails, the winged ef­fi­gies, a trip­tych of slate stones, the pen­nies by Re­vere’s Tomb. 617.851.2273

WALK­ING TOUR OF BEA­CON HILL

To­day, Bea­con Hill is one of Bos­ton’s most posh neigh­bor­hoods, and we’re talk­ing old money. This once-monthly tour, hosted by His­toric New Eng­land, takes par­tic­i­pants back to the Fed­eral Pe­riod fol­low­ing the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion, delv­ing into the for­tunes and am­bi­tions of the peo­ple who set­tled here and how those things shaped the ar­chi­tec­ture and lay­out that re­main to­day. May 7 at 11 am. Otis House Mu­seum, 141 Cam­bridge St., 617.994.5920

CON­TEXT TOURS

La­beled as “tours for the in­tel­lec­tu­ally cu­ri­ous” and of­ten led by Ph.D.-level schol­ars, Con­text Tours are in­tense. “Bos­ton’s Big Dig: Trans­form­ing a Cityscape” is just one of var­i­ous top­i­cal jaunts avail­able. On it, trekkers walk the Rose Kennedy Green­way study­ing ur­ban en­gi­neer­ing, ar­chi­tec­ture and to­pog­ra­phy to tell the story of eco­nomic devel­op­ment and civic iden­tity. 800.691.6036

BOS­TON BY FOOT

Fill 90 min­utes on the week­end with a tour of “The Dark Side of Bos­ton.” It’s one of many themes avail­able, but we like it be­cause it tack­les top­ics the av­er­age sight­seer might not oth­er­wise hear about: dis­ease out­breaks, body snatch­ers, rob­beries and the Mo­lasses Flood. Bos­ton by Foot is a fa­vorite of his­tory purists, mean­ing you’ll hear no tall tale on th­ese quests. Cor­ner of Hanover and Cross streets, 617.367.2345

BLACK HER­ITAGE TRAIL

Vis­i­tors walk this route that nav­i­gates through Bos­ton’s 19th-cen­tury African-Amer­i­can legacy. Four­teen stops (all in Bea­con Hill) in­clude the Lewis and Har­riet Hay­den House (part of the Un­der­ground Rail­road) and the African Meet­ing House (the old­est Black church still stand­ing in the U.S.). While it is pos­si­ble to self-guide, we rec­om­mend the Na­tional Park Ser­vice ranger-led tours (Tu-Th at 2 pm). Robert Gould Shaw Me­mo­rial, 25 Bea­con St., 617.742.5415

YE OLDE TAV­ERN TOURS

Per­fect for colo­nial his­tory buffs who en­joy sip­ping suds, too. Off­beat his­tor­i­cal facts about the pre-Rev­o­lu­tion­ary era in Bos­ton in­clud­ing cross­dress­ing sol­diers and Sa­muel Adams’ per­sonal hy­giene make great top­ics of dis­cus­sion while you sam­ple lo­cally­brewed beer at a few his­toric wa­ter­ing holes. Cor­ner of Park and Tre­mont streets.

THE HAHVAHD TOUR

Founded by an alum­nus and run by stu­dent guides, th­ese walk­ing tours of Har­vard Uni­ver­sity of­fer in­sider in­for­ma­tion into the Hub’s (and the world’s) pre­em­i­nent school. 1376 Massachusetts Ave., 855.455.8747

With PhotoWalks, it’s all in the de­tails

Har­vard’s Me­mo­rial Hall

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.