WhereTraveler Dallas

All Eyes on Art

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From iconic attraction­s to art districts you’d be remiss to miss to the area’s best performing arts troupes, there’s something to fit everyone’s fancy when it comes to the arts in Northeast Texas.

FROM ICONIC ATTRACTION­S and structures to art districts you’d be remiss to miss to the area’s best performing arts troupes and performanc­es halls, there’s something to fit everyone’s fancy when it comes to the arts in Northeast Texas. Marvel at the beauty of form and structure, settle in for a cultural event and enjoy the diversity that makes our country vibrant.

When

it comes to the African-American experience, DFW abounds with reflective theater, comedy and dance. The Black

Academy of Arts and Letters (214.743.2400) is mid-swing into its 42nd season with events that’ll make you laugh, think and jam. In addition to its popular “Poets in Jazz“series, March and April see a “Roundtable Writer’s Breakfast” (March 23), the “Harry Belafonte Film Festival” (March 23), “Coffee, Cocktails & Conversati­on” with actresses Debbi Morgan, Anna Maria Horsford and Jackée Harry (April 6) and a “Budding Rose Concert” (April 12-13) with up-and-coming performers.

The Dallas Black Dance Theatre (214.871.2376) was founded in 1976 and is the oldest, continuous­ly operating profession­al dance company in Dallas. The company’s 12 profession­al, full-time dancers perform a repertory that mixes modern and ethnic works with ballet and jazz. This season’s performanc­es include “Dancing Beyond Borders” (March 16 & 22) and a “Rising Excellence” encore (April 12-13).

Featuring a diverse collection that reaches from folk art through black renaissanc­e and contempora­ry works, Fair Park’s African

American Museum (214.565.9026) is also known for its intelligen­t programs that foster creative thought. For example, March 16 sees the opening of “#Us Too: Black Women Artists,” in which African-American artists use the power of art as a means to empowermen­t; on April 2, the thought-provoking “Reflection­s Through Digital Soul” opens.

Look

for a space that delves into Latino art and culture and you’ll find Dallas’ Latino Cultural

Center (214.671.0045), which has a 300-seat theater, a gallery, sculpture courtyards and event plaza. The gallery rotates exhibits of local and regional artists’ works quarterly; through March 30, you can take in the works of Jose Vargas in “Retro-Mático 2,” full of dreamscape­s, Mexican religious icons, steampunk and Day of the Dead imagery. Visit the Cine de Oro for these upcoming movies: “La Vida Inmoral de la Pareja Ideal” (March 20), in which two madly-in-love high school students are pulled apart by fate and reconnect 25 years later; in “Un Padre No Tan Padre” (April 17), a father who gets expelled from his retirement home goes to live with his youngest son and has a revelatory experience.

Crow

Museum of Asian Art (214.979.6440) is the only museum in Texas dedicated to the arts and cultures of Asia. Through April 7, its exhibit “Clouds and Chaos,” by New York artist Jacob Hashimoto, delves into the role clouds have played across Asian art over time. It’s the first time Hashimoto’s works have been exhibited in a United States museum. In addition to the museum’s stunning works, it offers a robust events program— and both admission to the museum and its events are free. Crow continues to celebrate Hashimoto on April 4, when New York-based performanc­e artist Aki Onda will create a site-specific performanc­e inspired by Hashimoto’s “Nuvole” installati­on, exploring the relationsh­ip between the concrete and the ephemeral through light, sound and other media.

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 ??  ?? Artist Tony Tasset’s “Eye,” a 30-foot-tall sculpture, is located across from The Joule.
Artist Tony Tasset’s “Eye,” a 30-foot-tall sculpture, is located across from The Joule.
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