This Day in His­tory

Woonsocket Call - - AMUSEMENTS -

On Jan. 14, 1963, Ge­orge C. Wal­lace was sworn in as gover­nor of Alabama with the pledge, “Se­gre­ga­tion for­ever!” — a view Wal­lace later re­pu­di­ated.

On this date:

In 1784, the United States rat­i­fied the Treaty of Paris end­ing the Revo­lu­tion­ary War; Bri­tain fol­lowed suit in April 1784.

In 1898, au­thor Charles Lutwidge Dodg­son — bet­ter known as “Alice in Wonderland” creator Lewis Car­roll — died in Guild­ford, Sur­rey, Eng­land, less than two weeks be­fore his 66th birth­day.

In 1943, Pres­i­dent Franklin D. Roo­sevelt, Bri­tish Prime Min­is­ter Win­ston Churchill and French Gen­eral Charles de Gaulle opened a wartime con­fer­ence in Casablanca.

In 1953, Josip Broz Tito was elected pres­i­dent of Yu­goslavia by the coun­try’s Par­lia­ment.

In 1967, the Six­ties’ “Sum­mer of Love” unof­fi­cially be­gan with a “Hu­man Be-In” in­volv­ing tens of thou­sands of young peo­ple at Golden Gate Park in San Fran­cisco.

In 1968, the Green Bay Pack­ers of the NFL de­feated the AFL’s Oakland Raiders, 33-14, in the sec­ond AFL-NFL World Cham­pi­onship game (now re­ferred to as Su­per Bowl II).

In 1969, 27 peo­ple aboard the air­craft car­rier USS En­ter­prise, off Hawaii, were killed when a rocket war­head ex­ploded, set­ting off a fire and ad­di­tional ex­plo­sions.

In 1970, Diana Ross and the Supremes per­formed their last con­cert to­gether, at the Fron­tier Ho­tel in Las Ve­gas.

In 1975, the House In­ter­nal Se­cu­rity Com­mit­tee (for­merly the House Un-Amer­i­can Ac­tiv­i­ties Com­mit­tee) was dis­banded.

In 1989, Pres­i­dent Ron­ald Rea­gan de­liv­ered his 331st and fi­nal weekly White House ra­dio ad­dress, telling lis­ten­ers, “Be­lieve me, Satur­days will never seem the same. I’ll miss you.”

In 1994, Pres­i­dent Bill Clin­ton and Rus­sian Pres­i­dent Boris Yeltsin signed an ac­cord to stop aim­ing mis­siles at any na­tion; the lead­ers joined Ukrainian Pres­i­dent Leonid Kravchuk in sign­ing an ac­cord to dis­man­tle the nu­clear arse­nal of Ukraine.

In 2004, For­mer En­ron finance chief An­drew Fas­tow pleaded guilty to con­spir­acy as he ac­cepted a ten-year prison sen­tence. (He was ac­tu­ally sen­tenced to six years and was re­leased in Dec. 2011.)

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