Young em­ploy­ees need bet­ter work­ing con­di­tions

Viet Nam News - - FEATURES -

Valen­tine Of­fen­loch of the ILO said that more than 2.3 mil­lion peo­ple in the world died an­nu­ally as a re­sult of work ac­ci­dents and dis­eases. Ever yeary, an ad­di­tional 313 mil­lion peo­ple suf­fer non-fa­tal work ac­ci­dents that nonethe­less leave se­ri­ous con­se­quences.

HAØ NOIÄ — Young work­ers face higher rates of dis­eases and ac­ci­dents than older work­ers, but fa­tal­i­ties among young work­ers are less com­mon, ac­cord­ing to ex­perts at the fo­rum ‘For a gen­er­a­tion of safe and healthy work­ers: Im­prov­ing work safety con­di­tions for young work­ers’ held yes­ter­day in Haø Noiä .

The fo­rum was or­gan­ised by the Oc­cu­pa­tional Safety and Health Ad­min­is­tra­tion under the Min­istry of Labour, In­valids and So­cial Af­fairs (MOLISA) and the In­ter­na­tional Labour Or­gan­i­sa­tion (ILO).

The fo­rum was held in re­sponse to the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, which will fall on April 28.

Dur­ing the fo­rum, ex­perts ex­change in­for­ma­tion and ex­pe­ri­ences re­lated to safe work con­di­tions for young work­ers, who are be­tween 15 and 24 years old.

Haø Taát Thaéng, di­rec­tor of the Oc­cu­pa­tional Safety and Health Ad­min­is­tra­tion, said that as a coun­try with a great num­ber of young work­ers, Vi­etä Nam had is­sued dif­fer­ent poli­cies and reg­u­la­tions re­lated to en­sur­ing work safety for young work­ers over the past few years.

The poli­cies and reg­u­la­tions state that en­ter­prises and em­ploy­ers must pro­vide train­ing about work safety for young work­ers and safe work con­di­tion norms in the agri­cul­tural, forestry and fish­ery sec­tors.

“How­ever, the coun­try still faces chal­lenges in pre­vent­ing and lim­it­ing work ac­ci­dents in gen­eral, and work ac­ci­dents for young work­ers in par­tic­u­lar, in­clud­ing chal­lenges in im­prov­ing aware­ness and skills on work safety,” he said.

Thaéng ex­pressed his hope that dur­ing the fo­rum, ex­perts would find so­lu­tions to re­solve the chal­lenges and not only im­prove work­ing con­di­tions and health for young work­ers, but also pro­mote sus­tain­able work op­tions for them.

“Ef­forts from the com­mu­nity will be con­nected to help pre­vent risks and dif­fer­ent forms of child labour,” said Thaéng.

Valen­tine Of­fen­loch of the ILO said that more than 2.3 mil­lion peo­ple in the world died an­nu­ally as a re­sult of work ac­ci­dents and dis­eases. Ev­ery year, an ad­di­tional 313 mil­lion peo­ple suf­fer non-fa­tal work ac­ci­dents that nonethe­less leave se­ri­ous con­se­quences.

Valen­tine sug­gested in­clud­ing con­tent about safe work­ing con­di­tions in cur­ric­ula in high schools and vo­ca­tional schools to set up a gen­er­a­tion of safer and health­ier work­ers.

Young work­ers should be en­cour­aged to dis­cuss and raise their opin­ions about work safety, she said.

Youth and their or­gan­i­sa­tions should be al­lowed to join the con­struc­tion and im­ple­men­ta­tion of work ac­ci­dents and dis­ease-pre­vent­ing pro­grammes.

Vieät Nam saw more than 8,900 work ac­ci­dents last year, killing and in­jur­ing more than 9,100 peo­ple, ac­cord­ing to the MOLISA. — VNS

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