Zam­bia’s suc­cess­ful elim­i­na­tion of 12th grade gap year - a re­flec­tion of im­proved ef­fi­cien­cies at its Ex­am­i­na­tions Coun­cil - ECZ

Zambian Business Times - - FRONT PAGE -

EX­AM­I­NA­TIONS COUN­CIL OF ZAM­BIA - ECZ has suc­cess­fully elim­i­nated 12th grade gap year fol­low­ing a record mile­stone of an­nounc­ing re­sults well ahead of time. This has been dubbed a na­tional ed­u­ca­tion sys­tem cul­tural turn - around that if prop­erly uti­lized, will lead to in­creased na­tional pro­duc­tiv­ity. ECZ last week on 19 Jan­uary 2018 an­nounced grade 12 ex­am­i­na­tion re­sults for the pupil stream that sat for Novem­ber to De­cem­ber 2017 ex­ams.......

• Math­e­mat­ics, Science and Com­mer­cial sub­jects still a chal­lenge for learn­ers EX­AM­I­NA­TIONS COUN­CIL OF ZAM­BIA - ECZ has suc­cess­fully elim­i­nated 12th grade gap year fol­low­ing a record mile­stone of an­nounc­ing re­sults well ahead of time. This has been dubbed a na­tional ed­u­ca­tion sys­tem cul­tural turn - around that if prop­erly uti­lized, will lead to in­creased na­tional pro­duc­tiv­ity. ECZ last week on 19 Jan­uary 2018 an­nounced grade 12 ex­am­i­na­tion re­sults for the pupil stream that sat for Novem­ber to De­cem­ber 2017 ex­ams.

Ex­am­i­na­tion re­sults are used as a pre-req­ui­site for en­try into ter­tiary in­sti­tu­tions such as trade schools, col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties. An­nounc­ing the break­through devel­op­ment at the min­istry head of­fices in Lusaka on Fri­day 19 Jan­uary, Min­is­ter of Gen­eral Ed­u­ca­tion Dr. Den­nis Wanchinga said that for the first time in the his­tory of Zam­bia, re­sults have been re­leased in record time that en­ables some can­di­dates who wrote this ex­am­i­na­tion to en­ter ter­tiary in­sti­tu­tions with­out a break of a year or more.

Dr. Wanchinga com­mended his staff at the Min­istry of Gen­eral Ed­u­ca­tion, Ex­am­i­na­tion Coun­cil of Zam­bia and other stake­hold­ers for their con­tin­ued hard work and com­mit­ment. He said that the train­ing of teach­ers as ex­am­in­ers last year and the au­toma­tion of pro­cesses as paid off by re­duc­ing time used to process the ex­am­i­na­tion re­sults.

The Gen­eral Ed­u­ca­tion Min­is­ter fur­ther an­nounced that the num­ber of schools record­ing 100% passes in­creased from fifty-one (51) to seventy-three (73) with re­cently up­graded schools record­ing good re­sults in Zam­bian lan­guages, ex­cept Chinyanja, Silozi and Chi­tonga.

At re­gional or provin­cial level, the top three (3) prov­inces in terms of pass rate were North­ern, Muchinga and South­ern prov­inces in or­der of de­scend­ing rank while the least three con­sti­tuted Cop­per­belt, North Western and Western Prov­inces.

Dr. Wanchinga gave the per­for­mance and pass rate per Prov­ince as fol­lows: North­ern (75.51%); Muchinga (73.29%); South­ern (70.06%); East­ern (68.51%); Cen­tral (av­er­age); Lua­pula (av­er­age); Lusaka (av­er­age); Cop­per­belt; North­west­ern; Western (57.64). It is how­ever not clear on how the best re­sults in terms of the per­cent­ages of those get­ting say be­low 10points, be­tween 10 to 15 points in the best (5) sub­jects to de­ter­mine which prov­inces will con­tribute more stu­dents into na­tion­ally pres­ti­gious and state sub­si­dized univer­sity and col­lege loan schemes which are awarded on merit of the grade 12 re­sults.

At a sub­ject level, the high­est mean score was recorded in His­tory (69.66%) while the low­est mean score was in Com­merce. The Min­is­ter di­rected the Direc­torate of Stan­dards and Cur­ricu­lum to in­ves­ti­gate the rea­sons be­hind this dis­mal per­for­mance in com­mer­cial sub­jects es­pe­cially”. The Per­for­mance in English, Math­e­mat­ics, Science and Bi­ol­ogy showed an im­prove­ment com­pared to 2016, with Science record­ing the great­est im­prove­ment from 32.83% to 43.58% in 2017. The per­for­mance of learn­ers in pure sciences - chem­istry and physics and com­puter stud­ies - was very good at 88.04%, 78.83% and 87.42% re­spec­tively. The min­is­ter re­vealed that the best per­for­mance by sub­ject group­ing is high­est in prac­ti­cal sub­jects, fol­lowed by lit­er­a­ture and lan­guages, so­cial science, busi­ness stud­ies and lastly nat­u­ral sciences. The low­est per­form­ing in this cat­e­gory was math­e­mat­ics and agri­cul­tural science.

Dr. Wanchinga di­rected that teacher ed­u­ca­tion and spe­cial­ized ser­vices unit be called upon to “in­ves­ti­gate why the two sub­jects are prov­ing to be a chal­lenge to our learn­ers”. He fur­ther urged his Provin­cial Ed­u­ca­tion Of­fi­cers – PEO’s, Dis­trict Ed­u­ca­tion Board Sec­re­taries - DEBSs, and Head Teach­ers to in­ten­sify im­ple­men­ta­tion of school based as­sess­ments and in­ter­nal mon­i­tor­ing.

Zam­bia’s Ed­u­ca­tion Sys­tem is rel­a­tively rated highly within the SADC re­gion but now needs to ex­tend its bench­mark­ing to com­pare with across Africa and global stan­dards. Zam­bia’s Gen­eral Cer­tifi­cate of Ed­u­ca­tion - GCE is in­ter­na­tion­ally rec­og­nized though not highly rated. The test of the qual­ity of an ed­u­ca­tion sys­tem is in its youth lit­er­acy rates ac­cord­ing to the UNICEF.

Zam­bia’s last listed lit­er­acy rate ac­cord­ing to UNICEF is at 64%, this is way lower when com­pared to even peer coun­tries such as Zim­babwe which is ranked at 91%, Ghana at 86%, Kenya at 82%. A re­port by the Bri­tish coun­cil in 2013 put Zam­bia’s lit­er­acy rate at 70.6%, mak­ing Zam­bia to be 25th out of 54 African coun­tries.

Min­is­ter of Gen­eral Ed­u­ca­tion Dr. Den­nis Wanchinga

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Zambia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.