Time to con­sol­i­date free­dom gains

The Herald (Zimbabwe) - - Cartoon, Q&a, Opinion - Stephen Mpofu Cor­re­spon­dent

If the plans and projects that the Gov­ern­ment has are im­ple­mented with speed and thor­ough­ness, the Sec­ond Repub­lic could well end up as an ex­am­ple of how a na­tion pulling to­gether as one peo­ple and not as a span of oxen and don­keys can make eco­nomic, so­cial and po­lit­i­cal trans­for­ma­tion a re­al­ity for other coun­tries to em­u­late.

ZIM­BABWE’S po­lit­i­cal oc­to­puses must have their hard shells slashed yesterday to cre­ate space for ma­jor­ity povo to oc­cupy and con­sum­mate Uhuru; other­wise the agrar­ian rev­o­lu­tion as a con­se­quence of the armed strug­gle in which gal­lant sons and daugh­ters of the soil sac­ri­ficed their pre­cious lives for free­dom — and with de­vo­lu­tion on its mark — will have been in vain.

Of course, the sub­ject in point here is that of “big­wigs” own­ing mul­ti­ple farms, while other Zim­bab­weans till in­fer­tile strips of land or scratch the ground, like chick­ens, search­ing for some­thing to keep soul and body to­gether.

The land au­dit is a topic dis­cussed so many times dur­ing the pre­vi­ous Gov­ern­ment of Pres­i­dent Robert Mu­gabe.

That it has still not been con­cluded will ob­vi­ously raise ques­tions among those des­per­ately in need of land about the ur­gency with which the au­thor­i­ties ought to con­clude this crit­i­cal mat­ter once and for all in or­der to equalise land own­er­ship among our peo­ple who had much of that fer­tile God-en­dowed as­set seized from them by those with­out knees dur­ing the colo­nial era.

But of course, our peo­ple should ex­er­cise some de­gree of pa­tience in the re­al­i­sa­tion that the Gov­ern­ment, which has promised to re­pos­sess ex­cess land for re­dis­tri­bu­tion to those of our peo­ple who need that re­source the most, needs to do a thor­ough and not a hap­haz­ard job.

Still, speed is im­por­tant here in set­tling that mat­ter so that come de­vo­lu­tion, the ma­jor­ity of Zim­bab­weans who live in ru­ral ar­eas will have some­thing to smile about when re­call­ing the hard­ships they suf­fered un­der suc­ces­sive white racist rule in Rhode­sia be­fore Zim­babwe’s in­de­pen­dence on April 18, 1980.

It prob­a­bly also needs to be stated here that plans by the Gov­ern­ment of the Sec­ond Repub­lic to make Zim­bab­weans live their hard won free­dom are be­yond re­proach.

What, how­ever, ap­pears to be lack­ing is how the au­thor­i­ties go about polic­ing the im­ple­men­ta­tion of their de­ci­sions to make them bear the de­sired re­sults and make Zim­babwe a bet­ter place for all to live.

For in­stance, the Gov­ern­ment needs to thor­oughly in­ves­ti­gate why peo­ple who re­ceive for­eign cur­rency from the Re­serve Bank of Zim­babwe (RBZ) to im­port goods or raw ma­te­ri­als sur­rep­ti­tiously charge cus­tomers in US dol­lars for their prod­ucts, but do not pay the wages of their work­ers in for­eign cur­rency.

Is the for­eign cur­rency from the sales not be­ing blued or spir­ited out of the coun­try by the owners of the com­pa­nies to be kept abroad, as was the prac­tice that the Panama pa­pers ex­posed whereby some big­wigs ex­ter­nalised forex to be banked abroad for them?

Above all, all cul­prits must be ex­posed in ad­di­tion to hav­ing their trad­ing li­cences re­voked as a warn­ing to other mis­chief-mak­ers that the Gov­ern­ment`s ea­gle eye is watch­ing them day and night.

It is also im­por­tant that power-and riches-hun­gry peo­ple have no big say in the im­ple­men­ta­tion of de­vo­lu­tion lest they use the pro­gramme as a cat spoor to sa­ti­ate their greed.

There will be no harm in them be­com­ing in­tox­i­cated with the scent of de­vo­lu­tion but their hands and tongues must be kept off it so that the ru­ral peo­ple may use deputised cen­tral Gov­ern­ment power to tran­scend the un­derde­vel­op­ment in which many wal­low even to­day.

Home -hol­i­day mak­ing pro­grammes should be crafted in all the prov­inces so that ru­ral dwellers are ac­quainted with tourist attractions that for many have re­mained near and yet so far away from them along with the money that tourists leave be­hind and which should be spent on im­prov­ing schools, health fa­cil­i­ties, home­steads, roads and bridges, dip tanks as well as con­struct­ing dams for ir­ri­ga­tion pur­poses es­pe­cially when rain fails as it ap­pears to be do­ing this sea­son.

There is prob­a­bly a need for re­search to be car­ried out in or­der to re­vive tra­di­tional fes­ti­vals that have waned over the years due to in­dus­tri­al­i­sa­tion and ur­ban­i­sa­tion so that ur­ban dwellers may take a breather vis­it­ing the fes­tiv­i­ties away from the hel­ter-skel­ter pace of life in ur­ban ar­eas.

If the plans and projects that the Gov­ern­ment has are im­ple­mented with speed and thor­ough­ness, the Sec­ond Repub­lic could well end up as an ex­am­ple of how a na­tion pulling to­gether as one peo­ple and not as a span of oxen and don­keys can make eco­nomic, so­cial and po­lit­i­cal trans­for­ma­tion a re­al­ity for other coun­tries to em­u­late. Viva Zim­babwe! Aluta con­tinua.

Tourists en­joy­ing a boat cruise in Vic­to­ria Falls

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