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The Manica Post - - Comment & Feedback -

THAT coun­cil em­ploy­ees are cor­rupt is sad, the clerks at the mar­ket place are not tick­et­ing some ta­bles. The mu­nic­i­pal of­fi­cers are al­ways ask­ing for bribes from of­fend­ers. Let us work with the Mayor to stop it — Lib­erty Ma­hoso, Mutare.

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The truth about Ad­vo­cate Nel­son Chamisa is his mind is not clean be­cause he took the lead­er­ship of his party vi­o­lently, thanks — For­mer MDC Mem­ber.

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We have some sour milk new brands in the shops that taste bad. The gov­ern­ment should pro­tect us from fake foods — Mahuhushe.

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The Pres­i­dent of the Re­pub­lic of Zim­babwe, Cde ED Mnan­gagwa is ap­plauded for read­ing the riot act to phar­ma­cists sell­ing drugs in for­eign cur­rency. But this is just the first step in the right di­rec­tion. Gov­ern­ment should come up with a clear pol­icy on rou­tine drugs for peo­ple with chronic con­di­tions like high blood pres­sure, di­a­betes, arthri­tis, heart fail­ure and anaemia. Most of the chronic con­di­tions man­i­fest when one turns into a se­nior ci­ti­zen, a stage in life when one be­gins to find it dif­fi­cult to fend for one’s own med­i­ca­tion. The rel­e­vant min­istries, that is the Min­istry of Fi­nance and Min­istry of Health and Child Care should en­sure that the con­sumers of rou­tine drugs get them for free, just as is the case with ARVS. Health should al­ways be a pri­or­ity — Nhamo Much­agu­misa, Pen­ha­longa.

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Par­lia­men­tar­i­ans must lead by ex­am­ple. The be­hav­iour of male par­lia­men­tar­i­ans needs fine tun­ing if the re­port on the sex­ual ha­rass­ment of fe­male par­lia­men­tar­i­ans (The Man­ica Post, 23 to 29 Novem­ber, 2018) is any­thing to go by. The fe­male par­lia­men­tar­i­ans who are sub­jected to this de­spi­ca­ble be­hav­iour were voted into of­fice, not by the fe­male elec­torate alone, but the male elec­torate as well. Any in­sult or in­deco­rous be­hav­iour meted out on these leg­is­la­tors is an in­sult to the elec­torate that has recog­nised these law­mak­ers as their torch bear­ers — Pa­triot.

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The as­cen­dancy of women is some­thing men just need to ap­pre­ci­ate. Women have not just proven them­selves as a force to reckon with in pol­i­tics alone, but in many other av­enues that re­quire in­tel­lec­tual thought. Bul­ly­ing them into si­lence to sat­isfy our male egos is coun­ter­pro­duc­tive. The best way to un­der­stand a woman is to al­low her to ex­press her views, and that right should be up­held even in the au­gust house — NM.

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A lot of women have built im­pres­sive CVs that have seen them hold high stakes in the ju­di­ciary, in cor­po­rate gov­er­nance and in the ed­u­ca­tion sys­tem. Why then should the views ex­pressed in par­lia­ment be the mo­nop­oly of male leg­is­la­tors? — MN.

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Zim­bab­weans de­spite our eco­nomic chal­lenges, po­lit­i­cal dif­fer­ences, whether you are ZANU-PF, Zim­babwe Peo­ple First, ZAPU and MDC-Al­liance, we should cher­ish the peace and sta­bil­ity we have. Law en­force­ment agents should deal ruth­lessly with those who want to dis­turb peace which is an envy of many coun­tries — Tawanda.

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The con­cerns raised by the fe­male leg­is­la­tors are an eye opener. The is­sue of sex­ual ha­rass­ment needs fur­ther in­ter­ro­ga­tion. If peo­ple who know bet­ter tram­ple upon self re­straint and par­lia­men­tary eti­quette just to pa­rade their male chau­vin­ism, what is the sit­u­a­tion like fur­ther down the lad­der? If a per­son who knows her rights to the lat­ter is a vic­tim of sex­ual ha­rass­ment, what is the sit­u­a­tion of a cleaner in this weird world, a florist, a gar­dener, a se­cu­rity guard, a sec­re­tary, a ven­dor, etc? I am not sug­gest­ing that these oc­cu­pa­tions are de­grad­ing, but just ham­mer­ing on the point that a cleaner is a cleaner, male or fe­male, a par­lia­men­tar­ian is a par­lia­men­tar­ian, male or fe­male, etc. It is the cor­rect dis­charge of du­ties that sets a worker apart not sex — No to Sex­ism.

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In a way to curb the high rate of di­vorce cases, churches must be on the fore­front of pre­mar­i­tal, mar­i­tal and post mar­i­tal coun­selling — Jum­buru.

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What pre­vi­ously made ur­ban rates to be low? The town coun­cils had farms to cush­ion ratepay­ers. What hap­pened to the farms, live­stock and farm ma­chin­ery? You ask the poor to pay what they don’t have. The pub­lic has lost con­fi­dence in the man­ner towns are be­ing run — Chipinge res­i­dent.

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Thumbs up to the Man­ica Post for pub­lish­ing the story as the fe­male law­mak­ers were rais­ing real is­sues, un­like the noise about le­git­i­macy is­sues that di­vide the peo­ple, who have no choice, but unity of pur­pose to push the coun­try for­ward. The law­mak­ers spoke as a united force, just as Zim­bab­weans should do on is­sues be­dev­illing the econ­omy — Nhamo Much­agu­misa, Odzi.

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To the Min­istry of Trans­port and In­fras­truc­tural De­vel­op­ment, can’t we have up­dates of how far the coun­try’s high­way du­al­i­sa­tion process has gone? Con­stant up­dates in the press are vi­tal — Ma­ton­hodze.

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