SNORKEL IN­STAL­LA­TION

SA­FARI ARMAX SNORKEL IS GIVEN THE NOD TO FREE UP THE TROOPY’S IN­DUC­TION.

4 x 4 Australia - - Gear -

V8 70 Series Cruiser own­ers who have the fac­tory raised-air in­take should take note that the three-piece prod­uct isn’t sealed against wa­ter ingress. Yep, that’s cor­rect, it’s not a real snorkel for deep-wa­ter wad­ing; it’s only a raised-air in­take for cleaner air.

Sure, there are a few op­tions with re­place­ments, but, for my Troopy with its free-flow­ing man­drel-bent ex­haust and mod­est power up­grade via a DP Chip, I wanted as much clean air shoved down its gob as pos­si­ble to al­low the en­gine to feed the best it can.

The huge four-inch-throated Sa­fari Armax snorkel is said to flow up to 70 per cent more than both the OE snorkel and its own stan­dard-sized Sa­fari re­place­ment, while of­fer­ing a wa­ter-tight sys­tem that won’t feed wa­ter into the en­gine dur­ing deep wa­ter cross­ings. The snorkel is UV sta­bilised, comes with a life­time war­ranty, and is made in Australia.

From the four-inch open­ing with the ram head atop, air flows down the A pil­lar and along a bul­bous tube on the front ’guard that measures up to roughly 15cm in di­am­e­ter (that’s huge) be­fore be­ing squeezed into a mod­i­fied air­box in­let. Dur­ing fit­ment of the snorkel, the air­box is also cut and mod­i­fied with the in­cluded hard­ware to en­sure max­i­mum air­flow through the air fil­ter, which is left as stan­dard.

Some wa­ter will enter the ram head when driv­ing in the rain, but the de­sign of the head base al­lows wa­ter to es­cape via slots and mouldings, pre­vent­ing en­gine harm due to wa­ter ingress. In highly dusty con­di­tions where you’re fol­low­ing other ve­hi­cles too closely, dust will get in. You have two choices here: slow down to sep­a­rate your­self from the ve­hi­cle in front; or loosen the ram head, ro­tate it and retighten it us­ing a Phillips screw­driver. You’ll lose any air-ram ef­fect by do­ing this, but it should only be a tem­po­rary change.

Since in­stal­la­tion of the Armax snorkel, the 4.5-litre en­gine seems to spin up smoother and faster than be­fore, re­sult­ing in im­proved ac­cel­er­a­tion – I haven’t had

it dyno’d, so this is just a seat-of-the-pants ob­ser­va­tion. Fuel con­sump­tion use hasn’t been checked over long enough pe­ri­ods to be sure of any im­prove­ments, so the jury is out on that at the moment. In ad­di­tion, the suf­fo­cated air-in­duc­tion noise from the OE snorkel head has gone, sug­gest­ing there are no air re­stric­tions with the Sa­fari Armax kit in­stalled – a great in­di­ca­tion of how much more free-flow­ing it now is.

DIY in­stal­la­tion is pos­si­ble, but there is a lot of cut­ting (outer mud­guard, air­box and ex­tra holes in the panel work) to mount the whole sys­tem. I opted for my lo­cal ARB out­let in Port Macquarie, NSW, to do the job for me. Watch how easy they make it look by vis­it­ing www.4x4aus­tralia.com.au

The Sa­fari Armax of­fers a huge in­crease in air­flow.

Air­box is heav­ily mod­i­fied to ac­cept the larger di­am­e­ter Armax.

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