NAT­U­RALLY AMAZ­ING

Dis­cover 10 of Tas­ma­nia’s most re­mark­able sights, from rugged na­tional parks to wildlife en­coun­ters, glo­ri­ous beaches, and spec­tac­u­lar moun­tain views.

Amazing Tasmania - - CONTENTS -

Ten of the most re­mark­able sights for your view­ing plea­sure. (Don’t for­get your cam­era!)

1 OVER­LAND TRACK, MT OSSA

Climb snow-capped Mt Ossa as part of the six-day Over­land Track, which kicks off at stun­ning Cra­dle Moun­tain and fin­ishes at Lake St Clair Na­tional Park. Peak sea­son is from 1 Oc­to­ber to 21 May, so make sure you book your place on this premier alpine ad­ven­ture early.

2 MARIA IS­LAND

East of the main­land, World Her­itage-listed Maria Is­land Na­tional Park is home to an ar­ray of stun­ning scenes, in­clud­ing crys­tal-clear waters and the rich gold and red hues of the Painted Cliffs, and na­tive an­i­mals in­clud­ing wom­bats, pademel­ons, sev­eral species of pos­sum, po­toroos, and echidna.

3 WINE­GLASS BAY (COLES BAY), FR­EYCINET NA­TIONAL PARK

Kick back and re­lax as you over­look the cu­ri­ously shaped coast­line at Wine­glass Bay. You might even spot a white-bel­lied sea ea­gle or a gan­net div­ing for food. Take a cruise around the penin­sula to see the pink gran­ite cliffs, or stroll along the white, sandy beaches and revel in the seclu­sion of the bay.

4 DEVILS@CRA­DLE, CRA­DLE MOUN­TAIN

Stop­ping in at the Tas­ma­nian Devil Sanc­tu­ary is a must. See these amaz­ing en­dan­gered crea­tures up close and learn about the sanc­tu­ary’s fight to save the species.

5 BAY OF FIRES

This breath­tak­ing bay ex­tends along Tas­ma­nia’s east coast from Bi­na­long Bay to Ed­dy­s­tone Point. Vis­i­tors can swim and surf in the wa­ter, or check out the in­cred­i­ble nat­u­ral sea gar­dens that are dot­ted along the shore. Abun­dant bird and sea-life makes this a fas­ci­nat­ing desti­na­tion for na­ture lovers.

6 MT WELLING­TON, HO­BART

Take the wind­ing road through for­est to the 1270-me­tre sum­mit of Mt Welling­ton and take in the spec­tac­u­lar 360-de­gree panorama of Ho­bart, the Derwent River, Tas­man Penin­sula and dis­tant moun­tain peaks. It can get snowy in win­ter so be sure to rug up.

7 CATARACT GORGE, LAUNCE­S­TON

Just a 15-minute walk from the city cen­tre, Cataract Gorge boasts what is be­lieved to be the world’s long­est sin­gle chair­lift span. En­joy a bird’s-eye view of the gorge and then stroll among the res­i­dent pea­cocks parad­ing in the beau­ti­ful Vic­to­rian-era gar­dens.

8 MOLE CREEK KARST NA­TIONAL PARK

With more than 300 lime­stone caves, the Mole Creek site, lo­cated in the cen­tral north of Tas­ma­nia, is a great place for a sub­ter­ranean ad­ven­ture. The in­tri­cate sys­tems are open for pub­lic ex­plo­ration and are home to a range of an­i­mals that have adapted to life in the dark­ness.

9 TAHUNE FOR­EST AIRWALK

The nearly 600-me­tre-long walk­way through the tree­tops at Tahune, on the edge of the South-West Wilder­ness, of­fers a dra­matic view of forested moun­tains and the Huon and Pic­ton Rivers. A can­tilever, 48 me­tres above the ground, al­lows you to view the canopy up close.

10 CRA­DLE MOUN­TAIN, LAKE ST CLAIR NA­TIONAL PARK

Pre­pare your­self for a visual treat as you lose your­self in the spec­tac­u­lar her­itage-listed na­tional park where you can spot red-necked and pademelon wal­la­bies and bird-life na­tive to Tas­ma­nia. The re­flec­tion of the dreamy sky­line on Dove Lake cre­ates an ethe­real at­mos­phere you’ll never for­get.

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