FIVE WAYS TO GET MORE FROM TH­ESE AC­TIV­ITY TRACK­ERS

Australian T3 - - STATE OF THE ART -

01 SHOOT FOR THE MOON

Cus­tomise your goals. The track­ers will start with de­fault daily step, floor and sleep goals, but once you get an idea of what num­bers you tend to rack up, you can set some goals for your­self that are both a lit­tle elu­sive but also at­tain­able, which will ideally prompt you to grad­u­ally in­crease the time you spend ex­er­cis­ing.

02 STRESS LESS

Once you have a han­dle on the pat­terns of your HR, a tracker can help you keep an eye on your stress lev­els. The Fit­bit’s guided breath­ing ses­sions won’t ap­peal to ev­ery­one, but they can bring some calm to peo­ple who feel stressed out.

03 MON­I­TOR FITNESS

HR is a great gauge of your im­prov­ing health and fitness. As you ex­er­cise reg­u­larly, you should see your rest­ing HR come down over time. Sporty folk should ex­pect a rest­ing HR in the re­gion of 40-60bpm. Over time, you should be able to run at a pace, such as 5:00/km, with a lower HR score than you used to get, as your fitness in­creases.

04 GET YOUR SHUT­EYE

Pri­ori­tise sleep. Train­ing is a cy­cle of stress then rest, but so few of us get the rest part right. A good tracker is the per­fect de­vice to help you con­sol­i­date the gains you should get from your train­ing, by get­ting enough shut­eye. Even if you’re not in train­ing as such, good sleep is al­ways good for you.

05 CHAL­LENGE YOUR­SELF

Floor climb­ing is bet­ter for burn­ing calo­ries than sim­ple step count­ing, but it also builds strength in your legs and back­side, and helps make them curvier. The tracker apps in­clude many so­cial and chal­lenge op­tions, so if mo­ti­va­tion starts to dwin­dle, give them a go.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.