What cloud is that you ask?

Clouds ap­pear in many shapes and sizes de­pend­ing where they were formed. They are ei­ther be made of ice or wa­ter droplets de­pend­ing on their al­ti­tude.

Cosmos - - Cosmos Science Club -

NAME: ALTOSTRATUS CLOUD LAYER: MID­DLE AL­TI­TUDE: 2000 – 5500M

A large, thin sheet of cloud that lives higher up in the at­mos­phere. The sun can be seen weakly though them and it can form op­ti­cal ef­fects such as coronas, which are caused by the dif­frac­tion of light by ice crys­tals.

NAME: NIMBOSTRATUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW & MID­DLE AL­TI­TUDE: 600 – 3000M

Nimbostratus for­ma­tions of­ten ap­pear dark grey and have no ap­par­ent fea­tures. They are gen­er­ally thick enough to block out the sun.

NAME: CIR­RUS CLOUD LAYER: HIGH AL­TI­TUDE: 5500 – 12,000M

Ap­pear as short, de­tached, al­most hair-like struc­tures that live at very high alti­tudes. Cir­rus clouds have a silky sheen and dur­ing the day they are the whitest cloud in the sky. But when the sun is set­ting they may change colour to that of the sun­set it­self re­sult­ing in vi­brant red/orange skies.

NAME: STRATUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW AL­TI­TUDE: 0 – 2000M

These clouds ap­pear as a grey­ish layer re­sem­bling fog or mist that sits close to the ground, they are of­ten as­so­ci­ated with foggy or misty con­di­tions. Stratus clouds some­times al­low sun­light to pen­e­trate through but if thick enough can block it out en­tirely. Blue skies usu­ally sit be­yond these low fly­ing for­ma­tions.

NAME: CUMULUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW AL­TI­TUDE: 350 – 2000M

Typ­i­cally hav­ing a fluffy ap­pear­ance, these clouds live closer to the ground than their al­tocu­mu­lus cousins and may have a dark base and vi­brant white top. If tem­per­a­ture, wind and mois­ture con­di­tions are just right they can grow into mighty cu­mu­lonim­bus clouds.

NAME: ASPERITUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW AL­TI­TUDE: 1200 – 3000M

These un­usual for­ma­tions re­sem­ble a rough­ened or ag­i­tated sea in mo­tion. The stun­ning vis­ual ef­fect is pro­duced by vari­a­tions in the chang­ing lev­els of light and thick­ness as the cloud moves across the sky.

NAME: STRATOCUMULUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW AL­TI­TUDE: 360 – 2000M

Stratocumulus clouds can ap­pear as grey­ish or white and come in sev­eral forms. Patches, sheets or lay­ers, joined or with gaps be­tween them the stratocumulus is a cloud of many faces.

NAME: CIRROCUMULUS CLOUD LAYER: HIGH AL­TI­TUDE: 6000 – 12,000M

Some­times known as ‘mack­erel skies’ these clouds have a rip­pled ap­pear­ance. The cloud is made up of lots of tiny cloudlets that com­bine in a reg­u­lar ar­range­ment cre­at­ing the dis­tinc­tive struc­ture.

NAME: AL­TOCU­MU­LUS CLOUD LAYER: MID­DLE AL­TI­TUDE: 600 – 5500M

Al­tocu­mu­lus for­ma­tions con­sist of small mid-level patches of cloud known as cloudlets. These patches can ap­pear in a range of shapes and have a more del­i­cate ap­pear­ance due to the pres­ence of ice which bright­ens their colour.

NAME: CU­MU­LONIM­BUS CLOUD LAYER: LOW, MID­DLE & HIGH AL­TI­TUDE: 350 – 2000M

‘ The King of the Clouds’. The cu­mu­lonim­bus’s ap­pear­ance is like an anvil, with a tow­er­ing cen­tral plume with a flat­tened top. The bot­tom is dark where rain or hail falls.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.