RE­SIS­TANCE TRAIN­ING MAKES YOU PUT ON WEIGHT

Are cy­clists miss­ing out on the ben­e­fits for fear of be­com­ing body builders?

Cycling Plus - - NEW KIT -

Weightlifters like to say that “no­body builds mus­cle by ac­ci­dent” - it takes an ex­treme rou­tine to turn your­self into an Ado­nis. Yet cy­clists shy away from the idea of re­sis­tance train­ing and, in do­ing so, ac­cord­ing to Paul Hough, miss out on many ben­e­fits.

“Re­sis­tance train­ing im­proves the strength of mus­cle, bone and other soft tis­sues. It also has a num­ber of meta­bolic health ben­e­fits such as im­prov­ing glu­cose and in­sulin me­tab­o­lism. For en­durance ath­letes, many stud­ies demon­strate that re­sis­tance train­ing can im­prove neu­ro­mus­cu­lar func­tion; specif­i­cally, it can en­hance cycling ef­fi­ciency and de­crease the risk of sus­tain­ing an overuse in­jury. Due to the pos­i­tive im­pact that this type of train­ing can have on health and per­for­mance, I rec­om­mend nearly all of my clients per­form at least two ses­sions per week. To max­imise the ben­e­fits, it is a good idea to in­crease pro­tein in­take on those days. I rec­om­mend 1.8g/kg of body mass.

“A care­fully de­signed re­sis­tance train­ing pro­gramme for an en­durance ath­lete has min­i­mal ef­fects on mus­cle size. Achiev­ing the lev­els of mus­cle hy­per­tro­phy that worry cy­clists re­quires eat­ing a calo­rie sur­plus. In fact, re­search has demon­strated that en­durance train­ing can ac­tu­ally ‘blunt’ mus­cle hy­per­tro­phy. This is why some body builders avoid en­durance ex­er­cise.”

“A care­fully de­signed re­sis­tance train­ing pro­gramme for an en­durance ath­lete has min­i­mal ef­fects on mus­cle size”

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