GONE COUN­TRY

Al­ways dreamt of trad­ing your city life for coun­try air? Whether you want to cre­ate a more tan­gi­ble ex­is­tence in some­what un­cer­tain times, are in search of a more “au­then­tic” way of liv­ing (or just look­ing to put this sea­son’s ging­ham tops to prac­ti­cal us

ELLE (Australia) - - Life -

TALE OF TWO CITIES

“MOVIN’ TO THE COUN­TRY, GONNA EAT A LOT OF…”

In their pre­vi­ous lives, Emily Ue­ber­gang and Sarah Groom worked in fi­nance and the food in­dus­try re­spec­tively, but now they co­hab­i­tate – along with Groom’s hus­band and two kids – on a farm­stead in north­ern NSW, around four-and-a-half hours from Syd­ney. They spend their days per­fect­ing their pro­duce, sell­ing pas­ture-raised eggs, kom­bucha and sauer­kraut, and host­ing farm­stays for those af­ter a taste of the sim­ple life (so, no Grey Gar­dens reclu­sive­ness here). They re­veal what it’s like to make the switch to a place where the grass is al­ways greener.

Peaches have an­tiox­i­dant and anti-in­flam­ma­tory qual­i­ties and have been cred­ited with re­duc­ing anx­i­ety (but leave the stone, it’s poi­sonous).

EX­PECT THE UN­EX­PECTED

In hind­sight, we were ill-equipped for what was to come, even with a few skills like know­ing how to fer­ment food and build a com­post. We’d spent a bit of time vol­un­teer­ing on farms to see what it was like, which is a great way to work out if it’s right for you. But mostly you need an open mind, en­thu­si­as­tic at­ti­tude and will­ing­ness to get in and get dirty. Plus a sense of hu­mour when things go wrong! The rest you can learn as you go. LEAVE YOUR EGO AT THE FENCE

If you don’t have the right at­ti­tude, you’re go­ing to feel crushed very quickly. It’s hard, iso­lat­ing work at times, and you’re prob­a­bly go­ing to be wrong 99 per cent of the time. The first months are like learn­ing to walk all over again. It’s still a work in progress and we’re con­stantly evolv­ing along­side our busi­ness. IT TAKES A VIL­LAGE

We live on the top of a moun­tain, up a wind­ing dirt road, and the clos­est town is nearly an hour away. We only knew two peo­ple be­fore mov­ing here, but the help and sup­port we’ve re­ceived from fel­low farm­ers and lo­cals has been over­whelm­ing. One of the most im­por­tant things is to really em­brace and value your com­mu­nity. IT’S WORTH IT

No two days are the same, and ev­ery day is an op­por­tu­nity to learn and grow. And there’s no traf­fic!

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