WON­DER WOMAN

ELLE (Australia) - - Beauty -

Natalie Port­man has been the beau­ti­ful face fronting the spec­tac­u­lar Miss Dior cam­paigns since 2010. To cel­e­brate its new in­car­na­tion, we chat­ted with the ac­tress and mother-of-two about fra­grance, France and fem­i­nism YOU’VE BEEN THE FACE OF MISS DIOR FOR SEVEN YEARS. DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE VER­SION?

I feel like it has evolved with me. The cur­rent one feels so like the part of life that I’m in. Right now, I really ap­pre­ci­ate things that take time, which is kind of the an­tithe­sis to our cul­ture where ev­ery­thing is dis­pos­able. The roses that go into the fra­grance only bloom for a few weeks out of the year. They have to be picked by hand. And the knowl­edge is handed down from one gen­er­a­tion to the next. It’s the kind of care and at­ten­tion that’s miss­ing these days. It’s like cou­ture in a bot­tle.

MISS DIOR IS ABOUT RE­BEL­LION. WHAT’S THE MOST RE­BEL­LIOUS THING YOU’VE DONE?

I went off to Morocco by my­self when I was 18. My par­ents said, “Please don’t,” and I was like, “Nope.” I did a lot of trav­el­ling on my own.

ARE YOU A FEM­I­NIST?

Yes. It’s con­fus­ing why any­one wouldn’t be. It just means you be­lieve we should all have the same op­por­tu­ni­ties and rights. That any­one thinks it’s radical is a wake-up call, and a good one. We must have been naive or we

weren’t pay­ing at­ten­tion to the fact men were rul­ing over all these women. It’s been in­cred­i­ble to get to see this sort of re­birth of fem­i­nism, which Maria Grazia Chi­uri has been such a pro­po­nent of.

YOU’VE LIVED IN PARIS AND LOS ANGELES. WHAT ARE THE DIF­FER­ENCES?

They’re com­plete op­po­sites, but very com­ple­men­tary. LA has the sun and that spe­cial light and so much na­ture. And Paris just has such a deep cul­ture. The en­er­gies of the cities are dif­fer­ent, too. LA is a young, chang­ing city. It’s very loose – ev­ery­one kind of just does what­ever they want. Paris is so es­tab­lished – there’s a lot of her­itage and more rules. I used to wear sweat­pants ev­ery day. Now I’d never wear them out of the house.

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED ABOUT BEAUTY?

In the US, if you have some­thing like a mole or a big nose, you try to hide it. In France, it’s em­pha­sised. They’re like, “That’s my thing – that’s what makes me dif­fer­ent.” They cel­e­brate the dif­fer­ences as the thing that makes you beau­ti­ful. That’s a good at­ti­tude to have.

WHAT’S THE BEST BEAUTY AD­VICE YOU’VE EVER RE­CEIVED?

Sun­screen. And some­one told me early on not to pluck my eye­brows. That’s im­por­tant be­cause now eye­brows are a thing.

HOW HAS YOUR BEAUTY ROU­TINE CHANGED SINCE YOU BE­CAME A MOTHER?

I now do ev­ery­thing in the shower. And I get acupunc­ture once ev­ery cou­ple of weeks and that really helps me. I don’t get a lot of time for glam­our, but of course, I still have my per­fume.

HAS HOW YOU WEAR FRA­GRANCE ALSO EVOLVED?

What I like has stayed rel­a­tively the same. When I was much younger, I’d go for sweeter smells. As an adult, I’m drawn to flo­rals like jas­mine, or­ange blos­som and rose. And through­out preg­nancy and moth­er­hood, you do be­come very sen­si­tive to smells.

HOW DO YOU FIND BAL­ANCE AS A WORK­ING MOTHER?

There are cer­tain treats I give my­self, like acupunc­ture or do­ing a crossword. Or I watch Masterchef Ju­nior with my son ev­ery week. I hike with friends a lot when I’m home, be­cause it’s ex­er­cise and I get to spend time with a friend and be in na­ture. They’re the things that let my mind re­lax a bit. The pace of work­ing and be­ing a mum is very in­tense, so it’s nice to have things that calm me.

WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO RED CAR­PET LOOK?

Clas­sic. You want to be able to look back in 10 years and still feel like it’s some­thing you would wear.

HAVE YOU GOT ANY HID­DEN TAL­ENTS?

I’m okay at a lot of things. I can sort of tap dance and I can sort of cook. I can change a di­a­per very well though.

WHO WOULD YOU SAY IS THE MOST IN­FLU­EN­TIAL WOMAN IN YOUR LIFE?

My mother. I’m lucky to have a won­der­ful mother. I def­i­nitely try to be like her, be­cause I can’t think of any better way to be.

Dress, $5,100, Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

“It’s been in­cred­i­ble to get to see this sort of re­birth of fem­i­nism, which Maria Grazia Chi­uri has been such a pro­po­nent of ”

Dress, $15,500, briefs, $1,250, both Christian Dior, (02) 9229 4600

LEAD­ING LADY Be­hind the scenes of the new Miss Dior cam­paign

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