THE NEW AGE OF AGE­ING

How to (grace­fully) wind back the clock.

ELLE (Australia) - - Contents -

“MY TOP THREE TIPS? NUM­BER ONE: SUN AVOID­ANCE. NUM­BER TWO: SUN AVOID­ANCE. NUM­BER THREE: SUN AVOID­ANCE” – DR STEPHEN MUL­HOL­LAND, PLAS­TIC SUR­GEON

IN OUR CUR­RENT CUL­TURE OF SELF-CARE AND AC­CEP­TANCE,

dis­cussing age­ing with an “anti” vibe is, well, an­ti­quated. Mind­sets are fi­nally shift­ing and women are no longer look­ing to erase ev­ery sign of a child­hood sum­mer well spent (we’re look­ing at you, freck­les). But there’s also no deny­ing that the de­sire to feel our best is linked to look­ing our best – even if the def­i­ni­tion of “best” is be­com­ing a hell of a lot more gra­cious. With the old­est co­hort of mil­len­ni­als reach­ing 37 this year, it’s no sur­prise that the global anti-age­ing mar­ket (their words, not ours) is grow­ing. Ac­cord­ing to Re­search And Mar­kets, the world­wide anti-age­ing busi­ness will reach a stag­ger­ing $88 bil­lion over the next five years when the first mil­len­ni­als en­ter their early for­ties. This boom­ing busi­ness means there’s a flood of new, in­no­va­tive prod­ucts and tech­nolo­gies that usher in age­ing with a gen­tler, friend­lier touch. The days of look­ing “done” are well and truly done, but the days of look­ing your best? Those are yet to come.

FIRST, A WORD ON OUR SKIN

“SKIN IS NOT JUST A BEAUTY DE­VICE, it’s also our largest func­tion­ing or­gan,” says or­thopaedic sur­geon turned skin­care guru Dr Barbara Sturm. It’s easy to forget it serves a much higher pur­pose than just be­ing a can­vas for creams and makeup – the skin is busy pro­tect­ing us from in­fec­tious micro­organ­isms, reg­u­lat­ing our body tem­per­a­ture and pro­duc­ing vi­ta­min D, among other im­por­tant du­ties. In short, it’s the ul­ti­mate multi-tasker, and if it’s forced to de­vote re­sources to an ad­di­tional chore (say, calm­ing a sun­burn or fight­ing off free rad­i­cals), something else has to give. “When you weaken the skin cells for one rea­son or another, the skin bar­rier func­tions are ba­si­cally screwed,” says Sturm. “It can’t do its job pro­tect­ing, and it lets UV and pol­lu­tion in. That causes in­flam­ma­tion and a host of is­sues.”

Si­mone Vescio, co-man­ag­ing di­rec­tor of skin­care brand Der­mavid­u­als, says it’s about tak­ing a dif­fer­ent ap­proach. “I want to dis­pel the myth the stra­tum corneum [outer layer of the epi­der­mis] is a con­glom­er­a­tion of ‘dead’, use­less skin cells – it’s not! Th­ese cells are a liv­ing struc­ture ca­pa­ble of self-reg­u­la­tion and in­te­gra­tion with other lay­ers of the skin. The un­der­ly­ing cells and sys­tems of the skin rely on the stra­tum corneum to func­tion in har­mony.” Skin health starts and ends with a healthy bar­rier func­tion.

PRE­VEN­TION (it’s not too late)

SUN EX­PO­SURE IS CU­MU­LA­TIVE, so there’s still plenty of time to pre­vent en­vi­ron­ment-in­flicted dam­age, es­pe­cially be­cause there’s a lot more than just UV caus­ing our skin grief. As well as pol­lu­tion, Sturm is par­tic­u­larly wor­ried about the glare from our ever-present mo­bile phones. “They emit high-en­ergy vis­i­ble [HEV] light, or blue light, which is a short wave­length. It won’t give you a burn but it goes deep into the skin lay­ers and causes in­flam­ma­tion,” she ex­plains. Re­search shows that over­ex­po­sure to blue light ac­cel­er­ates the ox­i­da­tion process, dam­ag­ing that ever-im­por­tant skin bar­rier and wors­en­ing wrin­kles, fine lines and hy­per­pig­men­ta­tion. It’s another rea­son to con­sider not only a dig­i­tal detox but also a pow­er­ful an­tiox­i­dant to pre­vent HEV from pen­e­trat­ing the skin. Se­lect a broad-spec­trum SPF laced with an­tiox­i­dants, or layer a min­eral SPF over your an­tiox­i­dant serum. “I prefer min­eral sun­screens over chem­i­cal,” says Natalie Abouchar, reg­is­tered nurse and founder of Syd­ney’s Privée Clinic. “Zinc is very heal­ing for the skin.” Vescio also deems zinc

“THERE’S NO SUB­STI­TUTE OR EQUIV­A­LENT FOR VI­TA­MIN A” – SI­MONE VESCIO, CO-MAN­AG­ING DI­REC­TOR OF DER­MAVID­U­ALS

“a su­per­charged an­tiox­i­dant” thanks to its abil­ity to pro­tect from free rad­i­cal dam­age. It aids in DNA re­pair and col­la­gen pro­duc­tion, too.

Another pre­ven­tive in­gre­di­ent that should be a non-ne­go­tiable each morn­ing is an anti-in­flam­ma­tory such as vi­ta­min B3 (or its de­riv­a­tive niaci­namide), says Dr Joseph Hkeik of Syd­ney’s All Saints Skin Clinic. “It plays a key role in more than 200 cel­lu­lar re­ac­tions, in­clud­ing cel­lu­lar en­ergy pro­duc­tion. No other in­gre­di­ent we know of be­haves this way, and it may ex­plain why it has such a wide range of skin ben­e­fits,” ex­plains Olay se­nior sci­en­tist David Khoo. “It boosts cell turnover and main­tains the skin’s mois­ture bar­rier, re­duces blotch­i­ness, de­creases fine lines and wrin­kles and evens out skin tone.” Khoo rec­om­mends the brand’s To­tal Ef­fects mois­turiser, which blends niaci­namide with vi­ta­min E and green tea to fur­ther fight free rad­i­cal dam­age, while Hkeik swears by the po­tent blend of B3, vi­ta­min C and amino acids found in Ra­tio­nale’s Im­mu­nol­o­gist Serum.

Vi­ta­min A (and its de­riv­a­tives) con­tin­ues to be the gold-stan­dard treat­ment at night. “There’s no sub­sti­tute or equiv­a­lent for vi­ta­min A,” says Vescio, who ex­plains that be­yond the su­per­fi­cial ben­e­fits (fad­ing pig­men­ta­tion and blur­ring fine lines), it also pro­motes cell turnover and may help pre­vent skin can­cer. It can be a tricky in­gre­di­ent, so ease into it by us­ing a gen­tler, over-the-counter for­mu­la­tion just a few times a week. And for sen­si­tive ar­eas, like around the eyes, pick a prod­uct de­signed to com­bat age­ing with ex­tra TLC. “The Olay Eyes Pro-retinol Eye Treat­ment con­tains retinyl pro­pi­onate, a gen­tler mem­ber of the retinoid fam­ily of in­gre­di­ents,” says Khoo.

WORDS BY JANNA JOHN­SON O’TOOLE

7. 10. 11.1. Vi­ta­min A Nanopar­ti­cles,$90, DER­MAVID­U­ALS, der­mavid­u­als.com.au2. Anti-pol­lu­tion Drops, $204, DR BARBARA STURM, mecca.com.au 3. Retinol Res­cue Overnight Cream, $143,CLARK’S BOTAN­I­CALS, mecca.com.au 4. To­tal Ef­fects7 In One Day Cream Nor­mal,$33, OLAY, 1800 028 280 5. Im­mu­nol­o­gist Serum, $163,RA­TIO­NALE, ra­tio­nale.com 6. Help Me Retinol Night Treat­ment, $65, PHI­LOS­O­PHY,1800 812 663 7. Su­per Sen­si­tive Shield SPF 30,$76.50, DERMALOGICA, dermalogica.com.au 8. Eyes Pro-retinol Eye Treat­ment,$49, OLAY, 1800 028 280 9. Dior Pres­tige Light-in-white Le Pro­tecteur UV Je­unesse Et Lu­mière, $170, DIOR, myer.com.au 10. Re­sist Omega+ Com­plex Serum, $36, PAULA’SCHOICE, paulaschoice.com.au 11. Tinted Day­wear SPF 30+ UVA – UVB, $32, IN­VIS­I­BLE ZINC, 1800 630 05612. Pri­vate For­mula Ad­vanced Night Cream, $49.95,DR LEWINN’S, dr­lewinns.com.au 13. In­tel­lishade Tru­phys­i­cal,$90, RE­VI­SION SKIN­CARE, en­vogue­skin.com.au

6.

8. 12. 9.

13.

4.

1.

3.

2.

5.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.