THE NEW PIZZA

Ste­fano Man­fredi scoured the pizzerie of Italy in the name of re­search and came back to Aus­tralia with fresh takes on how to make pizza a smash at home.

Gourmet Traveller (Australia) - - News - RECIPES & WORDS STE­FANO MAN­FREDI PHO­TOG­RA­PHY BREE HUTCHINS

Ste­fano Man­fredi scoured Italy in the name of re­search and came back with fresh takes on how to make pizza a smash at home..

While Italy, and more pre­cisely Naples, is where it be­gan, there’s no doubt pizza now be­longs to the world. But some­thing ex­cit­ing is hap­pen­ing in pizza’s spir­i­tual home. What I call the “new wave” of pizza has been gain­ing mo­men­tum in Italy over the past decade.

I’ve been re­search­ing pizza in Italy for many years now and I’ve no­ticed a huge change in the way it’s made at ev­ery step of the process. This has been led by chefs and piz­zaioli whose cu­rios­ity and eye for qual­ity has led them back to the fun­da­men­tal build­ing blocks of pizza-mak­ing, from the grow­ing of the grain and the milling process to tem­per­a­tures, fer­men­ta­tion and mat­u­ra­tion times for the dough.

Much like the move­ment away from in­dus­trial white bread to­wards ar­ti­san loaves, it’s a look back as well as a step for­ward – a move­ment that re­turns to pizza’s ori­gins be­fore in­dus­trial flour milling, while at the same time us­ing mod­ern ad­vances in stone-milling, ma­chin­ery and oven tech­nolo­gies.

New Pizza will take the reader through what we do at my pizze­ria, Piz­za­perta Man­fredi in Syd­ney. I’ve been a chef, run­ning restau­rants of the high­est qual­ity, for more than 30 years. I’ve stud­ied the meth­ods and pro­ce­dures of some of the pro­tag­o­nists of the new-wave pizza move­ment in Italy and this book is the re­sult.

My hope is that it will guide home cooks and pro­fes­sion­als alike to ex­plore the pos­si­bil­i­ties of pizza-mak­ing and to take pizza back to what it once was – a healthy and de­li­cious fast food.

Ba­sic pizza dough: di­rect method

“The di­rect method for pro­duc­ing pizza dough is the eas­i­est be­cause all the in­gre­di­ents are mixed to­gether at about the same time,” says Ste­fano Man­fredi. “This is the method most pizza-mak­ers use be­cause it’s sim­ple and quick. For our recipes, how­ever, we ex­tend the mat­u­ra­tion phase of the dough in the re­frig­er­a­tor so the cooked pizza is eas­ily di­gested and the flavour of the wheat max­imised. Us­ing an un­re­fined, stone-ground whole-wheat (not whole­meal) flour is im­por­tant be­cause less yeast is needed for fer­men­ta­tion and the mat­u­ra­tion phase is thus more ef­fec­tive.”

Man­fredi rec­om­mends Wal­laby brand T55 flour, avail­able from select su­per­mar­kets.

Dried yeast dough

“This pizza dough, for mak­ing the round, Naples-style pizza, is made us­ing read­ily avail­able dried yeast, which gives very con­sis­tent re­sults,” says Ste­fano Man­fredi. “Each 250gm ball of dough will make one 30cm pizza.”

Makes 6 (250gm each)

1 kg (6⅔ cups) un­bleached, stone­ground whole-wheat flour or strong bread flour 550 ml wa­ter, at room tem­per­a­ture

2 gm (¾ tsp) dried yeast

20 gm sea salt

1½ tbsp ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

1 Place the flour and 500ml wa­ter in an elec­tric mixer fit­ted with the dough hook. Be­gin mix­ing on low speed and knead un­til the flour has ab­sorbed all the wa­ter but isn’t com­pletely smooth (3-4 min­utes). Turn off the mixer and let the dough rest in the bowl for 15-20 min­utes.

2 Dis­solve the yeast in the re­main­ing wa­ter. Once the dough has rested, turn the mixer on to medium and add the dis­solved yeast. Mix for 2 min­utes, then add the salt, knead for 2 min­utes, then add the olive oil. Keep knead­ing un­til the dough is shiny and smooth (about 6 min­utes). In­crease the speed a lit­tle and knead for an­other 2 min­utes. A good way to check the elas­tic­ity is to stretch a piece of dough and if it forms a strong, trans­par­ent mem­brane with­out break­ing (sim­i­lar to blow­ing a bub­ble with gum), it’s ready.

3 Let the dough sit, cov­ered with plas­tic wrap, for 30 min­utes in win­ter or 15 min­utes in sum­mer. The dough is now ready to be shaped into balls and then rested fur­ther in the re­frig­er­a­tor be­fore shap­ing into discs ac­cord­ing to the in­struc­tions on the op­po­site page.

Ro­man-style pizza ba­sic dough

“Ro­man-style pizza is a fo­cac­cia-like pizza, cooked in a rec­tan­gu­lar tray,” says Man­fredi. “It’s light, full of large bub­bles and can be filled or topped with many in­gre­di­ents. Ro­man-style pizza doesn’t re­quire a wood-fired oven, but tra­di­tion­ally is cooked in a deck oven at al­most half the tem­per­a­ture of wood-fired pizza.

Makes 3 large pizze (550gm each)

1 kg un­bleached, stone­ground whole-wheat flour or strong bread flour

3.5 gm (1¼ tsp) dried yeast

650 ml wa­ter, at room tem­per­a­ture

½ tsp caster su­gar

25 ml ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

20 gm sea salt

1 Place the flour in an elec­tric mixer fit­ted with the dough hook. Dis­solve the yeast in 100ml wa­ter and add to the flour along with caster su­gar and an­other 400ml wa­ter.

2 Turn the mixer to its low­est set­ting and knead for about 2 min­utes un­til the wa­ter is to­tally ab­sorbed. Add the oil and salt and mix in. Dou­ble the speed of the mixer and slowly add the re­main­ing wa­ter, a lit­tle at a time, only adding more when the pre­vi­ous amount has been ab­sorbed. The mix­ture will look quite wet, but don’t worry – con­tinue mix­ing for 8-10 min­utes and you’ll see that grad­u­ally the dough will be­gin to stretch and form long gluten strands.

3 Rest the dough for 10 min­utes in the mixer bowl, then fold and leave to ma­ture in the re­frig­er­a­tor. Form into 3 sheets ac­cord­ing to the in­struc­tions on the op­po­site page.

Shap­ing the round base

1 Once dough is ready to be shaped, cut off a long piece from the edge with a bench scraper. The dough will feel soft, airy and mal­leable.

2 Take the piece of dough at one end and, us­ing both hands, form a ball of 200gm-250gm. Work by tucking the folds un­der the ball so that the top is taut and smooth (see im­age 1).

3 Pinch the dough un­der­neath the formed ball to sep­a­rate it from the long piece of dough. Re­peat to make more balls.

4 Roll each ball gen­tly on the work sur­face to make it even and round. Place the balls on a cov­ered non-stick tray. Make sure there’s at least a ball’s width be­tween each ball and the edges of the tray and that the balls don’t touch the cover (prop up the cover us­ing a few glasses). Lightly hy­drate the sur­face of the balls with a fine spray of wa­ter and leave to rise for 1 hour at 20C-24C, then re­frig­er­ate for at least 12 hours. The balls can sit in the re­frig­er­a­tor at around 4C-5C for up to 3 days.

5 Once the dough has ma­tured and tripled in size, re­move from the re­frig­er­a­tor and leave at room tem­per­a­ture for 3-4 hours (less in sum­mer and more in win­ter) be­fore form­ing the bases. Take a ball of dough and lightly sprin­kle some flour on top and along the edges where it touches the sur­round­ing balls.

6 Use a bench scraper to sep­a­rate the dough ball from its neigh­bours. Lift the dough ball from the tray and turn bot­tom-side up, re­veal­ing the bub­bles. Place the dough ball, still bot­tom-side up, on a small mound of flour and turn it over in the flour so that both sides are cov­ered.

7 Be­gin by us­ing your fin­gers to form a cor­nice (a raised bor­der) and push the dough out from the cen­tre, mak­ing the round larger.

8 Once it has dou­bled in cir­cum­fer­ence, re­move from the flour and place on the work sur­face.

9 Keep­ing one hand on one side of the base, gen­tly stretch the op­po­site side with the other hand and lift and slap the dough round from side to side, turn­ing the base. This will stretch the gluten in the dough and the base will get larger and larger (see im­age 2).

10 Once stretched to the de­sired size (our pizze are around 30cm in di­am­e­ter), place base back on the work sur­face and neaten. The base is now ready to dress with the top­pings and then bake.

Shap­ing the Ro­man-style base

1 Once the dough has been briefly rested, it needs to be folded a few times to give it strength. Oil your hands with a tea­spoon­ful of ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil, then lightly oil the work sur­face. Tip the dough out onto the work sur­face. Lift it gen­tly in the cen­tre and fold the ends un­der (or over) to meet in the mid­dle to form pock­ets of air

(see im­age 3)

2 Turn the dough 90 de­grees and re­peat the fold. Re­turn to the bowl, cover with plas­tic wrap and rest for 15 min­utes, then fold again. Rest for an­other 15 min­utes, then do a fi­nal fold as be­fore. Place the dough in an oiled plas­tic con­tainer with an air­tight lid and re­frig­er­ate for 18-24 hours to ma­ture.

3 Once the dough has ma­tured, turn out onto the work sur­face. Di­vide the dough into 3 pieces. 4 Shape each piece of dough by plac­ing your hands un­der the outer edges and slid­ing un­der, pulling some dough with you to meet in the mid­dle. The aim is to cre­ate tension in the dough. Re­peat sev­eral times un­til the dough has a ball-like shape.

5 Fold and gather with your fin­gers at the edge of each piece of dough, bring­ing the ball to­wards you by drag­ging it across the bench. This will even­tu­ally make the ball even and smooth. The dough balls should be left to rise again in 3 oiled con­tain­ers for 2 hours at room tem­per­a­ture.

6 Oil a 30cm-40cm oven tray or bak­ing tray with ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil.

7 Place flour on the work sur­face and turn out a piece of dough. Be­gin to press gen­tly on the sur­face of the dough with your fin­gers, stretch­ing it to roughly fit the size of the tray.

8 Trans­fer the dough to the bak­ing tray, gen­tly sup­port­ing the dough with as much of your arms as pos­si­ble. Stretch the dough gen­tly to fit and then make del­i­cate in­dents on the sur­face with your fin­gers.

9 Sprin­kle some ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil on the sur­face and then gen­tly spread it with your fin­gers (see im­age 4). The pizza is now ready to be dressed with top­pings or to go di­rectly into the oven to be pre-cooked.

Cook­ing round pizze

“Once they’re shaped and topped, here’s how to cook your round pizze,” says Man­fredi.

IN A WOOD-FIRED OVEN

With the floor tem­per­a­ture be­tween 360C-400C a pizza will take around 90 sec­onds to cook. Some piz­zaioli cook at tem­per­a­tures up to 450C and this takes less time. The pizza is put di­rectly on to the oven floor to cook, thereby get­ting an im­me­di­ate “lift”.

IN A DO­MES­TIC OVEN

Find a large ter­ra­cotta tile that fits on your oven rack. Place the rack on the bot­tom rung of your oven and the tile on top, giv­ing you plenty of room above to ma­nip­u­late the pizza. Turn to full heat with­out us­ing any fan-forced func­tion and let the oven run for at least 20 min­utes to heat the tile com­pletely. When the pizza is ready, use a floured pad­dle to take it from the bench to the tile. Close the oven im­me­di­ately.

At 250C-280C a pizza takes 3-5 min­utes to cook. It will have a crisp, bread-like tex­ture and should be no less de­li­cious than the wood-fired ver­sion.

Cook­ing Ro­man-style pizze

Ro­man-style pizza is of­ten pre-cooked. The cooked dough can be kept in the fridge and brought out, topped and heated in the oven when needed.

Pre­heat the oven to 250C with­out fan.

Take the sheet of Ro­man-style pizza dough and if the dough has risen ex­ces­sively press down gen­tly with the tips of your fin­gers to make small in­den­ta­tions.

Bake the pizza in the oven for 11-14 min­utes. If it’s brown­ing more on one side, your oven is not even and the tray may need to be turned.

Once cooked, re­move from the oven and let cool a lit­tle be­fore dress­ing with top­pings or al­low to cool com­pletely if us­ing later. The base can be wrapped tightly with plas­tic wrap and stored in the re­frig­er­a­tor for up to 3 days.>

Si­cil­ian ca­pers and an­chovies

“This is the pizza for the an­chovy lover,” says Man­fredi. “It com­bines all those salty, sea-breezy flavours of the Mediter­ranean. Re­mem­ber to use the best in­gre­di­ents, es­pe­cially when it comes to the ca­pers. They should be salted, not pick­led.”

Makes 1

80 gm (⅓ cup) canned San Marzano whole peeled toma­toes (see note)

250 gm ball of ba­sic pizza dough, shaped

100 gm fior di latte or buffalo moz­zarella

2 tbsp salted ca­pers (prefer­ably Si­cil­ian), soaked and rinsed

6 large or 12 small an­chovy fil­lets 12 Gaeta olives, pit­ted (see note)

2-3 pinches of best-qual­ity dried oregano Pinch of sea salt

1 tbsp ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

1 Place a large tile in the oven and pre­heat oven at high­est heat with the fan off for at least 20 min­utes.

2 Crush the toma­toes by hand and spread onto the shaped pizza base, leav­ing a 3cm-4cm bor­der. Thinly slice the fior di latte and place evenly over the tomato. Scat­ter with the ca­pers, ar­range the an­chovies and olives evenly over the tomato and scat­ter with oregano. Sea­son with a lit­tle salt and place the pizza in the oven for 3-5 min­utes un­til cooked, turn­ing to get an even colour. Once out of the oven, driz­zle the pizza with olive oil, cut into slices and serve.

Note San Marzano toma­toes are a va­ri­ety of plum tomato. If they’re un­avail­able, sub­sti­tute canned Roma-style toma­toes. Gaeta olives are medium-sized black olives from south of Rome, renowned for their plump, meaty tex­ture and ex­cel­lent tart, salty flavour. Sub­sti­tute Kala­mata olives. All these in­gre­di­ents are avail­able from select Ital­ian del­i­catessens.

Ro­man pizza with vitello ton­nato

“I love vitello ton­nato with crusty bread, so this Ro­man pizza is a favourite,” says Man­fredi. “My method of pre­par­ing it uses an im­pro­vised sous-vide, or low-tem­per­a­ture wa­ter bath, to cook the veal. If you have a sous-vide set-up, bet­ter still. It re­sults in juicy, pink meat with lots of flavour.”

Makes 8 filled Ro­man pizze

1 sheet of Ro­man-style pizza dough,

pre-cooked and cut into 8 squares

8 Tre­viso radic­chio leaves, cut into strips

Vitello ton­nato

1 veal girello (about 600gm-800gm), cut into 2 equal pieces (see note)

80 ml ( 1/3 cup) ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

100 ml dry white wine

2 small gar­lic cloves, crushed

2 bay leaves

2 small pars­ley stalks

2 whole cloves

2 tsp finely grated lemon rind

150 gm canned tuna, drained and roughly chopped

4 an­chovy fil­lets, drained and roughly chopped

250 gm may­on­naise

25 gm salted ca­pers (prefer­ably Si­cil­ian), soaked and rinsed (see tip)

4 tbsp finely chopped flat-leaf pars­ley

Fried ca­pers

2 tbsp salted ca­pers, soaked and rinsed Ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil, for shal­low-fry­ing 1 For the vitello ton­nato pre­heat the oven to 60C and place a deep, wide bowl filled two-thirds with wa­ter in for at least 30 min­utes so the wa­ter reaches the same tem­per­a­ture as the oven. Place the pieces of veal in sep­a­rate snap-lock bags with equal amounts of the ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil, wine, gar­lic, bay leaves, pars­ley, cloves and lemon rind. Sea­son and seal, en­sur­ing the air is squeezed out of the bag. Place each bag in an­other snap-lock bag, press­ing the air out of the sec­ond bag as well. Put the bags care­fully in the wa­ter bath, en­sur­ing they’re sub­merged. A plate may be needed to keep the bags un­der the wa­ter. Cook for 5 hours. Care­fully re­move the bowl from the oven, re­move the bags and place in a large bowl with plenty of ice and cold wa­ter. Cool for 10-15 min­utes, then re­move veal from bags, strain the juices through muslin and cut the meat into 32 thin slices.

2 To make the sauce, com­bine tuna and an­chovy with 125ml cooled, strained cook­ing juices and whisk to form a may­on­naise. Add ca­pers and pars­ley and sea­son with salt if nec­es­sary. 3 For the fried ca­pers, pat ca­pers dry with a pa­per towel. Fill the small­est pan you can find with oil to a depth of 1cm so you’ll use as lit­tle oil as pos­si­ble. Heat un­til oil be­gins to shim­mer (add a ca­per – If it sizzles, it’s hot enough). Add ca­pers, fry for 30 sec­onds, then re­move with a slot­ted spoon and drain on pa­per tow­els. Ca­pers will keep for a few days on pa­per towel in a sealed con­tainer.

4 To as­sem­ble, slice each pizza square in half hor­i­zon­tally. Pre­heat oven to 180C, then place halves back to­gether on a bak­ing tray and heat for 5-6 min­utes un­til crisp on the out­side but still soft in the mid­dle. Place the bases on a work sur­face and top with radic­chio strips, then 4 slices of the veal on each and dress with the tuna may­on­naise and some cooled fried ca­pers. Sand­wich with the top halves and serve.

Note Veal girello, a cut from the hind leg, is also sold as veal nut. It may need to be or­dered ahead from your butcher.>

Hot Cal­abrese

“This pizza calls for smoked pro­vola cheese and ’nduja, Cal­abria’s spread­able sausage,” says Man­fredi. Makes 1 (pic­tured p130)

2 Ital­ian-style pork and fen­nel sausages

1 tbsp ’nduja (see note)

100 gm smoked pro­vola (see note)

250 gm ball of ba­sic pizza dough, shaped 10 cherry toma­toes, halved

1 red or yel­low cap­sicum, trimmed, seeded and sliced into long strips

10 Gaeta olives, pit­ted (see note)

1 tbsp ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

1 Place a large tile in the oven and pre­heat the oven at high­est heat for at least 20 min­utes.

2 Re­move the sausage meat from the cas­ings. Place in a bowl with the ’nduja and mix well with hands or a fork. Thinly slice the smoked pro­vola and scat­ter evenly on the shaped pizza base, leav­ing a bor­der of 3cm-4cm.

3 Use a tea­spoon to dol­lop the sausage and ’nduja over the base, and scat­ter the cherry toma­toes, cap­sicum slices and olives on top. Sea­son with a pinch of salt. Place the pizza in the oven for 3-5 min­utes un­til cooked, turn­ing to get an even colour. Re­move and driz­zle with the olive oil. Cut into slices to serve.

Note ’Nduja is a spicy spread­able Cal­abrian salami. Gaeta olives are medium-sized black olives from south of Rome, renowned for their plump, meaty tex­ture and ex­cel­lent tart, salty flavour. If they’re un­avail­able, sub­sti­tute Kala­mata olives. Both are avail­able from select Ital­ian del­i­catessens. Smoked pro­vola is avail­able from Ital­ian del­i­catessens and spe­cial­ist cheese shops.

Ro­man pizza with cavolo nero frit­tata and ’nduja

“When my brother and I would come home from school or af­ter play­ing all day, my mother would make a frit­tata in what seemed like an in­stant,” says Man­fredi. “It was her quick fix for two hun­gry boys. As I grew up, my friends at school would have their egg sand­wiches and I had my frit­tata sand­wich. This re­calls that very sand­wich, with the grown-up ad­di­tion of spicy ’nduja. Ten­der spinach leaves can be used in place of the cavolo nero.”

Makes 8 filled Ro­man pizze (pic­tured p131)

1 sheet of Ro­man-style pizza dough,

pre-cooked and cut into 8 squares

4 tbsp ’nduja

70 gm young rocket leaves, trimmed

2 tbsp ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

Cavolo nero frit­tata

4 large cavolo nero leaves, stems re­moved 12 large eggs

4 tbsp grated parme­san

2 tbsp chopped flat-leaf pars­ley

80 ml ( 1/ cup) ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

3

2 small leeks, cut into thin rounds

2 gar­lic cloves, crushed

1 For the cavolo nero frit­tata, bring a saucepan of wa­ter to the boil and add the cavolo nero leaves. Boil for 3 min­utes, then drain, cool and chop.

2 Crack the eggs into a bowl. Sea­son to taste, beat lightly, then add the parme­san, pars­ley and cavolo nero. Beat lightly to com­bine. Heat half the olive oil in a fry­ing pan over medium-high heat and lightly fry half the leek and gar­lic un­til soft. This should take about 2 min­utes. Add half the egg mix­ture to the pan. Lift the edges care­fully with a spat­ula as it cooks. Keep do­ing this for about 90 sec­onds, then care­fully turn the frit­tata and cook the other side for a minute or so un­til the mid­dle feels firm. Al­low the frit­tata to cool in the pan be­fore re­peat­ing with the re­main­ing in­gre­di­ents to make a sec­ond frit­tata.

3 To as­sem­ble, slice each pizza square in half hor­i­zon­tally. Pre­heat oven to 180C, then place the halves back to­gether on a bak­ing tray and heat for 5-6 min­utes un­til crisp on the out­side but soft in the mid­dle. Re­move from the oven and spread a lit­tle ’nduja on the in­side of the top halves. Place the bot­tom halves on serv­ing plates or wooden boards and top with rocket leaves, then a quar­ter of a frit­tata. Sprin­kle with ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil, sand­wich with the top halves and serve.

“I love us­ing rocket as a cooked in­gre­di­ent rather than just as a salad leaf. Here it adds colour as well as a spicy note.”

Pancetta, wilted ru­cola and Ta­leg­gio

“Ta­leg­gio is a soft washed-rind cheese with a strong flavour from Italy’s Lom­bardy re­gion,” says Man­fredi. “It tones down some­what when cooked, but the smellier the bet­ter. I love us­ing rocket as a cooked in­gre­di­ent rather than just as a salad leaf. Here it adds colour as well as a spicy note.”

Makes 1

100 gm rocket, stalks re­moved

100 gm fior di latte or buffalo moz­zarella

250 gm ball of ba­sic pizza dough, shaped

1 tbsp grated parme­san

100 gm Ta­leg­gio, cut into small cubes

12 slices pancetta

1 tbsp ex­tra-vir­gin olive oil

1 Place a large tile in the oven and pre­heat the oven at high­est heat for at least 20 min­utes.

2 Bring a saucepan of salted wa­ter to the boil. Add the rocket leaves, sub­merg­ing them us­ing a wooden spoon. Blanch for 2 min­utes, drain and cool, then squeeze well to drain ex­cess wa­ter and roughly chop.

3 Thinly slice the fior di latte and scat­ter evenly over the shaped pizza base, leav­ing a bor­der of 3cm-4cm. Ar­range the rocket on the fior di latte and sprin­kle the parme­san over ev­ery­thing. Place the pizza in the oven for 3-5 min­utes un­til cooked, turn­ing to get an even colour. Re­move from the oven, ar­range the Ta­leg­gio on top, sprin­kle with pep­per, drape the pancetta over and driz­zle with olive oil. Slice and serve.>

Hot Cal­abrese (RECIPE P136)

STE­FANO MAN­FREDI

Pancetta, wilted ru­cola and Ta­leg­gio

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.