Ex­am­ple9 CHORD TONE S ONLY – PAR­AL­LEL HAR­MONY A 3RD AND 6TH ABOVE ...CON­TIN­UED

Guitar Techniques - - Lesson: Creative Rock -

If you have fol­lowed this se­ries on neo- clas­si­cal rock, you will see that we are merely play­ing dif­fer­ent in­ver­sions of the same arpeg­gios si­mul­ta­ne­ously:

1 5 1 one in­ver­sion higher is the same as a 1 3rd higher, and two 1 in­ver­sions higher is the same as a 6th higher. It is for this rea­son that 3rds and 6ths are also

2 2 3 3 in­ver­sions of each other. Play­ing a 3rd higher will pro­duce the same notes 3 as when play­ing a 6th lower (only an oc­tave apart). Con­versely, play­ing a 6th higher will gen­er­ate the same notes as a 3rd lower (although, again, they will be in a dif­fer­ent oc­tave). Fi­nally, note that the rep­e­ti­tion prob­lem in­her­ent

2 5 2 with par­al­lel mo­tion is in­creased 3 with each added 3 voice. For ex­am­ple, the first note of Guitar

2 1 (F) is re­peated by the sec­ond note 2 of Guitar 2, and again 4 4 in 0 the 5 third note of Guitar 3. This triple it­er­a­tion ap­plies to most of the 5 notes of Guitar 1 through­out this en­tire ex­am­ple. etc

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