The per­feCt jazz Solo!

CO­HE­SIVE STUDY:

Guitar Techniques - - PLAY: JAZZ -

[bars 18-21: Coltrane Changes] These changes are used here to dec­o­rate a ba­sic long II-V-I in Eb ma­jor. Each of the chords is spelt out ex­plic­itly with ei­ther a sim­ple ma­jor tetra­chord (R-2-3-5), a ba­sic ma­jor triad (R-3-5), or in the case of Bb7 w7e see a mi­nor mo­tif (R-2-b3-5) based off the fifth de­gree (5-6-b7-9). [bars722-25: Al­tered] Here we see two ways of us­ing the Al­tered sound, first

7 with t7he Di­min­ished Half-Whole scale against a static C7, im­ply­ing C13b9 (R-35-b7-b79-11-13). Next up it’s the turn of F Su­per­locrian, although we im­ply this tonal­ity by ex­ploit­ing the two neigh­bour­ing ma­jor tri­ads of B and C# from the

#r7ent as­so­ci­ated FB# MeFlomd7ic mi­nor, the pFa scale to our MBom­daej 7 Su­per­locrian.7D B Fm7 F7 Bmaj7 D7

aj7#Ï B Fm7 F7 Bmaj7 D7

F#Ï aj7#Ï B Fm7 F7 Bm D7 &B Fm7 7 Bm D7

lt­braÏ 4Ïa: CoÏ Cha#nÏge#sÏ

ne 4a: Coltrane Changes 4a: Coltrane Changes 4a: Coltrane Changes 4a: Coltrane5 6 Changes6 5 5 8 5 6 5 9 6 8 5 6 5 9 6 8 5 6 5 9 6 8 5 6 9 6 8 9 C7 C7 C7 C7 C7 4b: Al­tered 4b: Al­tered 4b: Al­tered 4b: Al­tered 4b: A9l­tered 9 8 9 8 9 8 9 8

8 Cm7 Cm7 Cm7 Cm7 Cm7 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 C half-whole C half-whole C half-whole C half-whole C8half9-wh1o0le 8 9 8 9 10 8 9 10 8 9 10

10 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 10 10 10 10 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 10 7 10 7 10 7 10 7 10 8 8 8 8 8 [bars 26-29: high notes] As we’ve pre­vi­ously seen, due to the per­cus­sive and rapidly de­cay­ing na­ture of a clean guitar tone, we’re sup­port­ing our ascending held high notes here with a se­lec­tion of ac­com­pa­ny­ing chord voic­ings. [bars 30-33: block-Chord blues & ‘basie’ fin­ish] What bet­ter way to end than with some slid­ing blues chords, switch­ing be­tween a pair of match­ing 6th and 9th shapes over C, to a block line based around har­mon­is­ing the Bb Blues scale (Bb-Db-Eb-E-F-Ab) in 13th chord frag­ments. The su­per-typ­i­cal chro­matic chordal idea that ends the piece is com­monly known as the ‘Basie’ end­ing,

Bb namGem­daajf 7 ter leg­en­daBry 7pi­anist and baEndleader,maj7

Wil­liaÏ m JÏames ‘Count’ Basie. Gmaj7 7 E maj7 Gmaj7 BÏ 7 E maj7 Gmaj7 BÏ 7 E maj7 Gmaj7 B7 E maj7 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 F7 alt F7 alt F7 alt F7 alt Fn7Ï

alt FÏ

'Al­tered Scale' F 'Al­tered Scale' F 'Al­tered Scale' F 'Al­tered Scale' F 'Al­tered Scale' 6 9 6 9 6 9 6 9 6 9 B B B aj7 B maj7 B aj7

J9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 10 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 8 8 8

J J8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 G7#

9 G7 9 G7 9 G7J9 G7 9

J J8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

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