EX­AM­PLES 1-3

Guitar Techniques - - LEARNING ZONE -

The a mi­nor Pen­ta­tonic scale isn’t the only scale that you can use over this les­son’s back­ing track; how­ever, we’re go­ing to stick to it through­out for the pur­poses of this les­son. The solo study fea­tures a con­sid­er­able amount of lat­eral mo­tion (shift­ing along the length of the gui­tar neck) and is a great way ex­tend­ing your ideas by pro­vid­ing the­matic de­vel­op­ment within your so­los. Fi­nally, note that this les­son’s tech­ni­cal study is not sup­posed to rep­re­sent a well-bal­anced solo. In­stead, it is a pretty un­re­lent­ing suc­ces­sion of three-note-per-string a mi­nor Pen­ta­tonic idea: so, it’s more of a tech­ni­cal work­out than a mu­si­cal piece.

We start off by em­ploy­ing some lat­eral mo­tion up the length of the gui­tar neck on the fifth and sixth strings us­ing pick­ing and fret­ting-hand tap­ping in con­junc­tion with fret­ting-hand legato. don’t be put off by the five-note group­ings (quin­tu­plets) played on the first and third beats of each bar. sim­ply tar­get the tap at the start of the fol­low­ing beat and the quin­tu­plets should take care of them­selves as long as you play them evenly.

al­though tagged seam­lessly onto the pre­vi­ous phrase, this ex­am­ple, which com­prises con­sec­u­tive 1-2-3 units, should be con­sid­ered as a us­able and in­de­pen­dent line in its own right. This is a good ex­am­ple of how fresh a com­mon scale se­quence can sound when it’s ap­plied to a pat­tern that in­cor­po­rates string skips.

a good ex­am­ple of how fresh a com­mon scale se­quence can sound when it’s ap­plied to a pat­tern that in­cor­po­rates string skips.

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