JIMMY PAGE TOOK ME ASIDE AND SAID, ‘YOU SHOULD BE PROUD OF BE­ING A STU­DIO MU­SI­CIAN; I USED TO BE A STU­DIO MU­SI­CIAN AS WELL’

Guitar Techniques - - PLAY -

In Part 2 of this mas­ter­class, Luke shared a few more con­cepts that he em­ploys when play­ing ‘out­side’; avoid­ing the usual blues and rock based Pen­ta­tonic licks.

“When­ever I hear some­body do some­thing I go, ‘Ah, what was that?’ You can find some amaz­ing stuff on YouTube, es­pe­cially some of the old play­ers that you never got a chance to see. If you re­ally want some deep stuff, do a lit­tle coun­try home­work. You see these guys back in the 50s that are just ridicu­lous play­ers, and you just feel so teeny and small.”

Luke uses a lot of chord de­rived shapes in his im­pro­vi­sa­tion in or­der to move away from the usual scalar ap­proach. “I love it when peo­ple say there’s only three chords,” he says. “They ob­vi­ously haven’t seen Ted Greene’s Chord Chem­istry book, where you can play an A chord nine mil­lion dif­fer­ent ways and with all these cool dif­fer­ent voic­ings.”

So will us­ing chord tones help you dis­cover new sounds? “Ev­ery­one has a ten­dency to play ‘in the box’. But try to think in chord shapes rather than lin­ear scales. Scales have a ten­dency to sound like scales. Also try skip­ping strings – I mean, look at a guy like Eric John­son, he’s just ridicu­lous.”

One thing Luke picked up from Larry Carl­ton was to su­per­im­pose dif­fer­ent tri­ads over chords, which is a great way to ac­cess the up­per ex­ten­sions us­ing the shapes that you’re

Db al­ready fa­mil­iar with; so play­ing a triad

E13b9. over E gives you an You’ll find it’s less daunt­ing to play over al­tered chords when you think in terms of su­per­im­posed tri­ads.

In this part of the les­son Luke shows how he uses Phry­gian, Phry­gian Dom­i­nant and Span­ish Gypsy scales, su­per­im­posed chords and scales and, of course, string skip­ping.

The chal­lenge is to move out of the box yet sound ap­pro­pri­ate to the style you’re play­ing. Steve says the vi­tal skill as a ses­sion player is in­ter­pre­ta­tion. The more ways you can de­velop to play over any given mu­si­cal sce­nario, the more op­tions you’ll have when it comes to the ses­sion. Hav­ing four, five or six al­ter­na­tives pro­vides the gui­tarist with a vir­tu­ally end­less set of ideas.

Many thanks to Steve for lend­ing his valu­able time, price­less ex­pe­ri­ence and vast mu­si­cal tal­ent to this video mas­ter­class.

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