Watch­men Noir

Colour­less comic The clas­sic graphic novel gets re­pub­lished in a gritty black and white edi­tion that high­lights the amaz­ing art­work

ImagineFX - - Reviews -

The clas­sic graphic novel gets re­pub­lished in a gritty black and white edi­tion that high­lights the amaz­ing art­work.

Au­thor Alan Moore Artist Dave Gibbons Pub­lisher DC Comics Price £33 Web www.dc­comics.com Avail­able Now

First re­leased 30 years ago, Watch­men has gone on to be­come a sig­nif­i­cant piece of 20th cen­tury lit­er­a­ture. This new edi­tion presents the clas­sic in a fresh light by de­pict­ing the mas­ter­ful ink and pen­cil il­lus­tra­tions in raw black and white.

Do­ing away with John Hig­gins’ vi­brant colour­ing from the orig­i­nal is a bold move that’s sure to split opin­ion. On the one hand, read­ers get to en­joy the same story while gain­ing a greater in­sight into Dave Gib­bon’s il­lus­tra­tions. While on the other it begs the ques­tion: is this ver­sion nec­es­sary?

It de­pends on how the reader wants to en­joy the se­ries. If they’re new to it, it might be worth read­ing Watch­men in colour as it was orig­i­nally in­tended. But if you’re al­ready fa­mil­iar with the se­ries, Watch­men Noir presents a re­fresh­ing take on a fa­mil­iar text. Oddly, there’s no ex­pla­na­tion be­hind this hard­cover edi­tion, mak­ing Watch­men Noir feel al­most per­func­tory – even though there are 300 pages of grip­ping story and re­mas­tered art to pore over.

Rorschach shakes up re­tired su­pervil­lain Moloch; the lack of colour takes noth­ing away from the power of Dave Gibbons’ line-art.

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