Do more with Ter­mi­nal

Don’t be afraid of the com­mand line – put its power to good use!

Mac Format - - IMPROVE -

Don’t be afraid of the com­mand line – put its power to good use!

There was a time when all com­put­ers were con­trolled us­ing a com­mand line – you typed in strings of char­ac­ters to make your ma­chine do some­thing. The Mac’s graph­i­cal in­ter­face su­per­seded this way of work­ing (for good rea­son), but in fact the com­mand line lives on as a way the tech­ni­cally minded can of­ten per­form cer­tain tasks more quickly than with a graph­i­cal in­ter­face; it’s also fre­quently a means by which to ac­ti­vate ‘hid­den’ set­tings that Ap­ple has de­cided not to en­able gen­eral ac­cess to. In other words, it’s about con­trol.

Ter­mi­nal can be found in Util­i­ties within the Ap­pli­ca­tions folder; open it and you see a text-based prompt. At this point, it’s not ob­vi­ous what to do, but you can view a huge list of com­mands at www.ss64.com/osx, or type man and a com­mand (for ex­am­ple, man ls) and hit ® to ac­cess doc­u­men­ta­tion. Type q to re­turn to the com­mand line.

It’s worth not­ing that Ter­mi­nal is dra­gand-drop aware: you can nav­i­gate your Mac’s stor­age with com­mands, but it’s quicker to just drag an item from Finder

With Ter­mi­nal you can of­ten per­form cer­tain tasks more quickly than with a graph­i­cal in­ter­face

to the com­mand line (make sure the cu­sor is in the right place). To find out what di­rec­tory you’re in, type pwd (which means ‘print work­ing di­rec­tory’) and hit ® ; to change di­rec­tory, type cd and then a path (or type cd, a space, and drag a folder from Finder onto Ter­mi­nal), then ® . Craig Gran­nell

You can do a lot of clever stuff with Ter­mi­nal, once you know what you’re do­ing…

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.